John Wesley – II

Lead: John Wesley returned from America in 1737 deeply dissatisfied with his performance as a clergyman and missionary. He was seeking something deeper and said he found it in a heart strangely warmed.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Wesley was a typical orthodox, apparently devout Anglican clergyman in 1737, but his purely intellectual commitment to Christianity and his failed performance as a missionary to the colony of Georgia in the previous two years, awakened in him a powerful sense of despair and spiritual collapse. While in Georgia he had a chance meeting with a group of Moravians, a pietistic sect founded by German Count Nickolaus Zinzendorf. When Wesley returned to London he began to meet with the Moravians and in 1738 during a meeting in Aldersgate Street, had a spiritual encounter he later described as transformative. He recalled his intellectual conviction of the faith confirmed by a strangely warmed heart and a personal religious experience of grace.

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William F. Cody and the Pony Express II

Lead: Perhaps the most famous Pony Express rider was a teenager named Billy Cody.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Before it was rendered obsolete by the transcontinental telegraph the Pony Express, for a short eighteen months, embodied all that was romantic, dangerous and exciting about the settlement of the Western United States. Young Billy Cody was well on the way to establishing his reputation as an adventurer by the time the first Express rider left St. Joseph, MO. in the spring of 1860. In the half century after it ceased operation Cody helped keep alive the legend and excitement about this brief episode in communication history. During his years as a showmen Cody demonstrated the Pony Express at work in most performances of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. 

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William F. Cody and the Pony Express I

Lead: In the settlement of the West, two institutions are firmly linked in the common memory: the Pony Express and William F. Cody.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Few characters in the development of the Western United States were as well-known as William F. Cody, "Buffalo Bill." His story is shrouded in legend as much as fact. The hero of dime novels and magazines, the subject of rumor, myth and down right lies, as much as any figure Cody came to symbolize the romance and allure of the West. He served as an Army scout, cowboy, contract hunter for the railroads, gold miner, and then was one of America's foremost showmen. 

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Taft and Roosevelt Split

Lead: In the years leading up to the 1912 election President William Howard Taft and his predecessor, Theodore Roosevelt, fell out. This meant Woodrow Wilson became President.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: On balance the Presidency of William Howard Taft was not without its accomplishments. He established a process leading to a annual Federal budget, continued Roosevelt's emphasis on the conservation of natural resources and vigorously enforced anti-trust legislation. However, by many standards, Taft paled when compared to his predecessor. He was a dull speaker, his physical presence was overshadowed by the tireless vitality of Roosevelt and his political skills did not measure up to the former President. Soon after his election in 1908 Taft allowed the congressional Republican Party to slip out of control and a split developed between traditional conservatives led by House Speaker Joseph Cannon and a group of insurgents angered by what they felt was a drift away from the progressive policies of Teddy Roosevelt.

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The Raft of the Medusa, Art Driving Politics

Lead: Theodore Gericault (Tay aw DAWR ZHAY ree KOH), The Raft of the Medusa (1818-1819), depicted a human tragedy of epic proportions. It was a political embarrassment to the post-Napoleonic French monarchy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Gericault’s painting, approximately 16 X 23 ft., hangs in the Louvre. It portrays the horrific experience of some of the survivors of the French frigate Medusa, which ran aground off the West African coast of Senegal in July 1816. The painting depicts suffering survivors on a drifting raft at sea. Medusa, carrying 400 passengers, was the flagship of a small fleet commissioned take back possession of the port of Saint-Louis after a period of occupation by the British.

 

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George Rogers Clark Captures Fort Vincennes

Lead: In the dead of winter, leading a small band of volunteers George Rogers Clark crossed hundreds of miles and secured the territory of Indiana for the United States.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the American Revolution the Ohio Valley was the scene of intense struggle between the British and their native American allies and Virginians attempting to secure the strategic territory for the fledgling United States. In the summer of 1778 an expedition of about 200 men led by George Rogers Clark moved down the Ohio taking old French forts and claiming them for the United States. In July he arrived in Kaskaskia in Illinois just south of St. Louis and established his headquarters.  

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The Valley of the Fallen

Lead: At his death in 1975, the remains of Francisco Franco were interred in a elaborate basilica carved from a mountain and topped with a 500 foot stone cross in El Valle de los Caidos, the Valley of the Fallen. It is an exquisite obscenity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 1940s Francisco Franco, Spain’s Head of State and leader of the victorious Nationalist insurgents in the bloody Spanish Civil War, like many tyrants before him, entered his Egyptian phase. He began to build his tomb. 

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The Great Eastern

Lead: In November, 1857, Isambard Kingdom Brunel tried to launch his magnificent creation. Great Eastern, the heaviest object anyone had ever attempted to move, got stuck.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brunel was one of the most successful engineers of his day. He constructed what was at that time, the world’s longest tunnel, several unusual railroad bridges, and finally, Great Eastern. Conceived as the first luxury liner, the ship was designed to carry 4,000 passengers in complete comfort, haul enough coal for a non-stop round-trip from England to Australia, and earn her inventors’ money back in a couple of years. No such luck. No profit was ever made with Great Eastern.

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