Reagan vs. Brown II

Lead: Champion of liberalism, in 1966 California Governor Pat Brown eagerly awaited the election against a political novice from L.A. His optimism was misplaced.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brown's glee was aroused by the prospect of running against Ronald Wilson Reagan, a washed up actor who had become General Electric's corporate spokesman in the 1950s. He was a rising conservative political activist whose last-minute infomercial helped raise Republican spirits if not its vote count in the ill-fated Goldwater campaign of 1964. Brown thought he was a pushover and engaged in a little piece of political chicanery to help Reagan win. Brown's operatives released some political dirt about Reagan's opponent George Christopher. In the primary Reagan beat him badly.

 

 

Waddell’s Revenge II (Civil War)

Lead: Denied his back pay by the U.S. Navy, Lieutenant James Waddell believed his promise not to fight against the Federal government had been voided. They should have paid him.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In March 1862, after twenty years of faithful service in the US Navy, Waddell received his commission for Confederate service. Two years of shore duty followed before he got his chance to go to sea. In the twilight of the Confederacy with his new nation on the ropes, he assumed command of the commerce raider CSS Shenandoah off the coast of West Africa. It was a graceful three-masted steamer which under steam and sail could outrun most Union Navy ships. On October 30, 1864 Shenandoah captured its first prize, the Alina out of Searsport, Maine, ship and cargo worth $95,000. Waddell's revenge had begun.

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Waddell’s Revenge I (Civil War)

Lead: Denied his back pay by the U.S. Navy, Lieutenant James Waddell believed his promise not to fight against the Federal government had been voided. They should have paid him.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In March 1862, after twenty years of faithful service in the US Navy, Waddell received his commission for Confederate service. Two years of shore duty followed before he got his chance to go to sea. In the twilight of the Confederacy with his new nation on the ropes, he assumed command of the commerce raider CSS Shenandoah off the coast of West Africa. It was a graceful three-masted steamer which under steam and sail could outrun most Union Navy ships. On October 30, 1864 Shenandoah captured its first prize, the Alina out of Searsport, Maine, ship and cargo worth $95,000. Waddell's revenge had begun.

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Anatomy of a Presidential Scandal (Cleveland) II

Lead: After being nominated for President by the Democrats in the summer of 1884, Grover Cleveland was publicly accused of fathering an illegitimate child.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Cleveland was able to negotiate the shoals of scandal for several reasons. First, from the beginning, he told the truth. About 1871, widow Maria Halpin came from Jersey City to Buffalo where she found work in the retail clothing trade. She was a tall, stunning beauty, spoke French and soon was seen in the company of several men, one of whom was Grover Cleveland. Their relationship was intimate and sexual. When her son was born in the fall of 1874, she named him Oscar Folsom Cleveland, in honor of Cleveland and his law partner. Cleveland accepted responsibility and provided for both mother and child. When the scandal broke, he confided the truth to a number of prominent clergy and political leaders.

Anatomy of a Presidential Scandal (Cleveland) I

Lead: It is difficult to keep perspective at a time when passions are engaged and salacious revelations stir the body politic. Yet, such a time is the perfect occasion to examine the past to gain perspective by looking at the anatomy of a Presidential scandal.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Oh, to be a Democrat in the summer of 1884. Victory was in the air. For the first time since the nomination of James Buchanan in 1856 the Party had a real chance to take the White House. Every four years this ragtag collection of yellow dog dixiecrats and immigrant Yankees would drink and party their way to the nomination of a pair of political nonentities, who would then promptly go out and lose. Not this time. This time they had a winner.

The Conciliar Movement II

Lead: With the Church split into factions, with three popes claiming the obedience of Roman Catholics the leaders of Christian Europe met in the Swiss village of Constance to clean up the mess.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1409 at the Council of Pisa, the leaders of the church met to bring some kind of order out of the chaos that grew from having rival popes one in Rome the other in Avignon in the south of France. They were also trying to come up with way of governing the Church that broadened its leadership base. Many in the church led by Pierre D'Ailly of Bishop of Cambrai in France advocated a change in Church government that would retain the office of Pope but place him under a General Council of Bishops which would be the ultimate authority in the Church. At Pisa the Council deposed the rival popes and appointed one of their own. He soon died and his successor took the name John XXIII. The other popes refused to go, that meant there were three.

 

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The Conciliar Movement I

Lead: To a Europe beset by plague, war and economic depression, the Church offered precious little help.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the late 1300s Europe was in trouble. The Black Death was the in process of reducing the population by as much as a third. The Hundred Years' War between France and England was tearing up the French countryside and both countries’ economies. To make matters worse, the continent’s one unifying institution was itself in disarray. For seventy years Popes of the Roman Catholic Church lived in Avignon in southern France. Suspicious that the Church was then a pawn of the French king, English and German Catholics increasingly looked elsewhere for spiritual guidance.

 

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Whiskey Rebellion IV

Lead: In the winter of 1794 President George Washington sent an army into western Pennsylvania to put down a rebellion among farmers opposed to a federal tax on whiskey.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Passed to pay the lingering debts run up by the former colonies in the American Revolution, the excise tax on whiskey was deeply resented by farmers in the west who distilled spirits and used them for medicine as well as a form of money, trading whiskey for farm supplies, clothing and most other needed goods. When a citizen militia led by back country lawyer David Bradford threatened to sever western Pennsylvania from the rest of the state or perhaps even secede from the Union, President George Washington declared them traitors and sent a delegation to investigate and an Army to put down the rebellion.

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