Marie Sklodowska Curie I – A Personal Word from Dan Roberts

Lead: In 1937 Marie Curie died of leukemia caused in part by her long exposure to radiation seeking to determine its value in medical treatments. Today I would like to share a personal word.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the quarter century I have written and related these narratives as a public historian I have avoided making myself the focus of the story. Nevertheless, recently many loyal and supportive listeners have expressed concern about a perceived change in the quality of my voice. They are correct to have noticed this change. Perhaps the struggle of Madame Curie is a good platform to explore the value and challenges associated with radiation.

American Revolution: Invasion of Canada III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: On the last day of 1775 an outnumbered force of American troops attempted to capture the City of Quebec and solidify Yankee control of Canada. Led by Colonel Benedict Arnold and General Richard Montgomery, about 1000 troops attacked from two directions. Their object was Lower Town at the borders of which the British had erected two rough barricades. The main part of the city was surrounded by a high wall and cliffs such as Diamond Point which soared high above the St. Lawrence River.

American Revolution: Invasion of Canada II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: For many Americans the possibility of making Canada an ally in the Revolution seemed a live one. In June 1775 Congress ordered an invasion in two separate thrusts. Benedict Arnold led 1000 men in an heroic winter crossing of the Maine wilderness. The men endured terrible privation and the expedition substantial losses due to the cold and wet weather, the harrowing cross-country trek and the departure of a third of Arnold’s command. They arrived at the gates of Quebec in early December.