Highland Immigration to Carolina

Lead: Desperate to escape what they considered oppression by their landlords, beginning in the 1740s thousands of Scots broke the bonds of tradition and affection and laid course for the Cape Fear Valley of North Carolina.

 

                Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

               

Content: Few social communities in early modern Europe were as loyal and devoted to their land and leaders as the people of northwestern Scotland. In their rugged mountains and wind-swept islands, these Highlander’s struggle for mere existence was intense. Families who hacked a bare living from the sometimes unforgiving soil were deeply loyal to their kinsmen and local chieftains. Yet, as the modern era matured changes that were taking place in the outside world began to affect the Highlands. Late in the 1600s the demand for beef in the urban lowlands and England ushered in the cattle droving business. Huge and highly profitable cattle drives helped concentrate wealth in the hands of an upper-class elite whose new wealth was based on cash.

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The Escape of the Dalai Lama

Lead: With chaos gripping his capital city and his life in danger, the fourteenth Dalai Lama, the spiritual and political leader of Tibet, reluctantly fled across the Himalayas into exile.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.
Content: For nearly a decade before the spring of 1959, Chinese military forces had occupied Tibet. In the years following the victory of the Communists under Mao Tse-tung, China had been telegraphing her intentions to invade and occupy the nation of Tibet which it considered its own territory. This was not the first time China had cast its eyes on the Himalayan mountain kingdom. For centuries the two nations had existed in a kind of tense relationship, facing each other across armed and disputed borders Occasionally, China would spill over Tibet and hold it for a time. In the wake of the Chinese Revolution in 1911, the Tibetans expelled the Chinese and declared their independence.

 

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Marie Sklodowska Curie II

Lead: Winner of two Nobel prizes, the French physicist Marie Curie, born Maria Sklodowska near Warsaw, Poland, helped advance the understanding of radioactive substances.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Learning was a lifetime passion for Marie Curie. Her parents lived and taught in a private school and as a child she demonstrated a remarkable memory in academic matters but hers was not a purely abstract scholarship. During Maria's childhood, her native Poland could not be found on the maps of eastern Europe. For centuries Polish territory had been parceled out to hostile neighbors and in 1863, due to an abortive revolt, Poland had become little more than a Russian province. The Polish language was suppressed. As a teenager she took part in the secret nationalist "free university" where she taught the Polish language to women workers.

Marie Sklodowska Curie I – A Personal Word from Dan Roberts

Lead: In 1937 Marie Curie died of leukemia caused in part by her long exposure to radiation seeking to determine its value in medical treatments. Today I would like to share a personal word.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the quarter century I have written and related these narratives as a public historian I have avoided making myself the focus of the story. Nevertheless, recently many loyal and supportive listeners have expressed concern about a perceived change in the quality of my voice. They are correct to have noticed this change. Perhaps the struggle of Madame Curie is a good platform to explore the value and challenges associated with radiation.

American Revolution: Invasion of Canada III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: On the last day of 1775 an outnumbered force of American troops attempted to capture the City of Quebec and solidify Yankee control of Canada. Led by Colonel Benedict Arnold and General Richard Montgomery, about 1000 troops attacked from two directions. Their object was Lower Town at the borders of which the British had erected two rough barricades. The main part of the city was surrounded by a high wall and cliffs such as Diamond Point which soared high above the St. Lawrence River.

American Revolution: Invasion of Canada II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: For many Americans the possibility of making Canada an ally in the Revolution seemed a live one. In June 1775 Congress ordered an invasion in two separate thrusts. Benedict Arnold led 1000 men in an heroic winter crossing of the Maine wilderness. The men endured terrible privation and the expedition substantial losses due to the cold and wet weather, the harrowing cross-country trek and the departure of a third of Arnold’s command. They arrived at the gates of Quebec in early December.