American Revolution: Washington, New Commander II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the years prior to his emergence on the national and international stage, in many ways the personal and professional destiny of George Washington was forged in the Ohio Valley. He knew the area because of his work as an aspiring surveyor of western lands. Because of this familiarity with the Ohio, in 1753, Virginia Governor Dinwiddie sent him and a small group of frontiersmen on a diplomatic mission to seek alliance with Iroquois nations and to deliver a letter demanding the French withdraw back into Canada. When the French politely rebuffed the Governor’s demand, Washington returned to Virginia and Dinwiddie published the diary of his journey which was read widely, even as far as London, thus enhancing his growing reputation.

American Revolution: Washington, New Commander I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In late spring, 1775 George Washington of Virginia was elected by the Second Continental Congress as Commander-in-Chief of the newly created Continental Army. By early July he and his staff were in Boston to assume his new command. What he found must have given him pause. The troops handed into his care were badly led, poorly equipped, and sorely undisciplined. The man who arrived in Cambridge on July 2, 1775 to assume command of this motley assembly was ambivalent about the task he had accepted. Though he would remember his satisfaction when told of the American performance at the Battle of Charlestown Heights, often called the Battle of Bunker Hill or more precisely Breed’s Hill, this did not convince him that the colonial military enterprise could win through to victory. Facing down the most powerful nation in the world was not a commission that he accepted lightly. He protested to Congress that he was not equal to the task, but he took the command out of a profound sense of honor.

Virginia Resolves II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: Having laid before the Virginia House of Burgesses in May 1765 five resolutions condemning the revenue-enhancing Stamp Act recently passed by the British Parliament, Patrick Henry, newly-elected delegate from Louisa County and widely famous as a result of the court case known as the Parson’s Cause, rose to brilliantly defend the so-called Virginia Resolves. He did so in a manner so extravagantly provocative that in the minds of some present, he edged over the line into disloyalty to the Crown. He first did a historical riff reminding the listeners of Caesar’s Brutus and King Charles I’s Cromwell and anticipated that some American would rise to defend his Country from the acts of the current monarch, King George III. This was clearly incendiary language and the Speaker of the House, John Robinson, warned him that his rhetoric was edging very close to treason.

 

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Virginia Resolves I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: When word of the passage of the Stamp Act reached the colonies in Spring 1765 there was little immediate reaction, but in the latter days of May, the Virginia House of Burgesses passed a series of resolves so radical and strong that their passage set off a storm of protest and economic reprisals in the other colonies that within a year Parliament was forced to repeal the Act.

 

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Estee Lauder: Beauty Industry Innovator

Lead: The daughter of immigrants, Josephine Esther Mentzer, a.k.a. Estée Lauder set the industry standard for women’s beauty products in 20th Century America.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Esther grew up a borough girl in Queens, the ninth and last child of Max and Rose Mentzer. Early on she became fascinated with the creams and fragrances that her mother used and that her relatives sold in their stores. As a teenager she learned merchandizing and customer relations, caught up as she later wrote, “by pretty things and pretty people.” She learned early on from her Uncle John Schotz the benefits of hands-on selling demonstrating how products worked on the faces and hands of her customers.