Matthew Brady II

Lead: During the Civil War the images of Matthew Brady and his associates lent vivid reality to the horror of conflict.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having made his reputation photographing notable figures in the prewar generation, when conflict broke out in 1861, Matthew Brady went to war. Determined to make a complete record of the war, he hired more than a dozen photographers and sent them out as field operatives to mark the passage of the fighting. They used the collodion "wet-plate" process which fixed the image on a thick glass negative. This method required the subject to pose for only a brief period, but still could not capture action or physical movement.

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Scott Joplin II

Lead: Having reached maturity as a composer and fully established as a ragtime musician, Scott Joplin produced what some consider the first great American opera.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: By the first decade of the 20th century, Scott Joplin had become a celebrated composer and performer. His compositions were sold and played widely and his reputation as a performer was on the rise. During that decade he was also putting his hand toward his original opera, Treemonisha (1911). The themes of this work are loosely autobiographical though the story is unique. Living in a small rural community of former slaves, Monisha and Ted discover an abandoned infant under a tree and raise her as their own giving her the name memorialized in the opera. Like Joplin, her parents arrange for her to be educated by a white family in exchange for manual labor. The girl emerges from childhood to take a place of leadership in the community.

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Scott Joplin I

Lead: Born during Reconstruction, Scott Joplin became a role model for talented black musicians as the Ragtime era blended into the Age of Jazz.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Joplin was born in northeast Texas in 1868 to a laboring family suffering the abuse that was the lot of blacks at the hand of whites humiliated by the loss of the civil war and the Reconstruction regime imposed by the Federal government. He grew up in Texarkana. His parents were musically inclined and insured his exposure to church music. This aroused in him an early hunger to perform, eventually mastering guitar, cornet, and piano. His constant practicing enhanced Joplin’s natural talent which was only enriched by his German-born teacher Julius Weiss, who was so impressed with Joplin’s prospects that he gave him free lessons in advanced harmony, sight-reading, and musical theory. Though he was being schooled in the music of Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin, his first love was in the syncopated rhythms of ragtime.

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Ahmed Khan Durrani: Father of Afghanistan

Lead: In the history of Afghanistan few names exceed the importance of Ahmed Khan.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Throughout its history as a nation Afghanistan has had to jealously guard its position and independence. It is a desert land, dry and mountainous with a certain desolate beauty, whose attraction to its neighbors has less to do with this natural resource than its strategic position across the path of conquest from the central plains of Asia into the rich Indian sub-continent. The Afghan people are an alliance of tribal groups the majority of which derive their ethnic heritage from a racial group known as Pushtoons and speak an Indo-European language that is related to but does not come from Persian.

 

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First Ladies: Lou Henry Hoover

Lead: Married to one of the most reviled and revered Presidents in U.S. history, Lou Henry Hoover considered it a privilege to stand in his shadow.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Lou Henry was a banker’s daughter and met her husband the future President in the laboratory of their favorite Stanford Professor, geologist John Casper Branner. He was shy but they hit it off right away and shortly after he graduated, Lou and Herb Hoover were informally engaged.

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Ray Kroc and the World of Fast Food II

Lead: In the mid-1950s salesman extraordinaire Raymond Albert Kroc charmed the founders of a little restaurant chain into placing him in charge of expansion. His problem: feeble profits.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the consummate marketer, Kroc was able to sell franchises at a rapid rate, but there was no mechanism to force franchisees to adhere to McDonald’s business model and his obsession with “QSC – Quality, Service and Cleanliness.” The solution was to go into the real estate business. The company would buy the land and build the building and after a rigorous selection process sell the outlet to the franchisee, whom Kroc now considered his partner, at a ridiculously low rate. The conditions for operation were built into the lease for the property, the cost of which was determined by a graduated percentage of gross sales.

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Ray Kroc and the World of Fast Food I

Lead: Born at the dawn of the twentieth century, master salesman Ray Kroc helped transform the way the world consumed food.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After brief service as an ambulance driver trainee in World War II, Kroc began his professional life and gradually absorbed the craft of salesmanship. After nearly two decades with cup manufacturer Lily-Tulip, rising to mid-western sales-manager, Kroc became fascinated with the multispindled milkshake maker. He eventually bought the company, Prince Castle, and in the post-World War II business revival the company prospered.

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American Revolution: Washington, New Commander III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1755 London determined to capture Fort Duquesne, a fortress the French had built at the Forks of the Ohio near present-day Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and drive the French from the Ohio valley. They sent a large expedition of British regulars under General Edward Braddock. George Washington joined Braddock’s staff as a Lt. Colonel, but on the trail, Washington became severely ill. Fortunately, he re-joined the Braddock column in time to participate in the Battle of the Monongahela. The British were ambushed and suffered a catastrophic defeat. Braddock was a brave but incompetent leader, unused to wilderness fighting, and when his forces stumbled into the French and their Native American allies, suffered a defeat counted among the worst the British suffered in the war. Braddock was killed and Washington rallied the remaining troops, took command of the rear guard and organized an orderly and strategic retreat even though he was still wracked with fever and a severe headache. His performance in battle and in the retreat won him admiration from his men and the authorities in both Virginia and London.

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