American Revolution: Battle of Charleston Heights IV

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: As the steamy morning of June 17, 1775 proceeded, British troops under General William Howe were trying to take out Americans defending strong breastworks thrown up along the front of Breed’s Hill in the Charlestown Heights across the harbor from Boston. Howe’s troops were trying to do something difficult under any circumstances: attack across open ground up-hill into the face of an entrenched enemy. Wave after wave of Britain’s finest were cut down until finally, the Americans exhausted their ammunition. When the firing stopped, the British troops spilled over the top of the Patriot breastworks, bayonets flashing. Cleaning up the remaining Americans there cost the British precious time. Meanwhile, Patriots led by Colonel William Prescott retreated from Breed’s Hill in relatively organized fashion under covering fire from their compatriots on the beach. Soon all were falling back at a run to Bunker Hill. They crossed over Bunker Hill and retreated back across the Charlestown Neck. By dusk the British controlled all of the Charleston peninsula up to the Neck.

American Revolution: Battle of Charleston Heights III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Dawn, June 17, 1775 revealed a significant strategic shift in the siege of British-occupied Boston in that Patriot forces had occupied and fortified Breed’s Hill and Bunker Hill on the triangular-shaped Charlestown peninsula across the Bay northwest of the city. This was a threat the British had to engage. After much debate the four leaders Generals Thomas Gage, William Howe, John Burgoyne and Henry Clinton eventually decided on a troop landing near Moulton’s Hill on the Northeast corner of the peninsula. When British intentions became obvious, Colonel William Prescott who was leading Patriot defenders on the Charlestown Heights, realized his vulnerability to a flanking attack from the beach on his left. Prescott sent Captain Knowlton to block this approach. When re-enforced by regiments led by Colonels John Stark and James Reed, they lined up their men behind a temporary breastwork made of rocks and fence railing and prepared for the British assault.

American Revolution: Battle of Charleston Heights II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The British Army under General Gage was locked up in Boston by New England Patriot regiments surrounding the city. Gage was also severely exposed should American forces occupy the heights, particularly those over the village of Charlestown: Bunker Hill, Breed’s Hill and Moulton’s Hill, 110, 75 and 35 feet high respectively. His fears were realized when word leaked out of his intention to fortify those hills and colonial military leaders led by Artemas Ward moved to grab the Charlestown Heights especially Bunker Hill.

Christian Children’s Fund

Lead: From 1937 to 1940 as many as 2,000,000 Chinese children died of starvation in the wake of the Japanese invasion. Calvitt Clarke set out to do something about it.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The twentieth century has borne witness to much progress in technology and at least in some fortunate parts of the world an advance in the standard of living, health and nutrition. But this era has also seen an unprecedented growth in suffering and bloodshed. The specter of total war has at times engulfed the entire world. No longer was the civilian population spared when armies were on the move. Predator governments turned first on their own people then on neighboring nations in what at times seemed to be an endless round of ethnic and ideological conflict.

Promontory Point

Lead: With thousands of acres of land and millions of dollars at stake, two great railroads rushed across the flat, barren Utah plains toward their marriage of iron.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At 11 in the morning May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific's Jupiter pulled up to its assigned position just feet away from the Union Pacific's Number 119. It was a bright but cold day, about 1500 people were gathered including the president of the Central Pacific, Leland Stanford and the Union Pacific's Thomas C. Durant.

 

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U.S. Mid-term Elections of 1946

Lead:  Although the Democrats, led by Harry S. Truman, lost both Houses of Congress during the mid-term elections of 1946, Truman skillfully used the Republican majority to his benefit – and won the 1948 presidential election.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt four months into his fourth term on April 12, 1945, barely-known Vice-president Harry S. Truman of Missouri became President. He stepped into the shoes of one many assumed was a giant. During Roosevelt’s presidency, Republicans had been unable to gain control of Congress.

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The Great Awakening I

Lead: Out of the intellectual ferment of the Eighteenth Century Enlightenment emerged a rush of devout pietism. The Great Awakening helped transform American religious life.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The wars of religion that convulsed Europe following the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Revival in the 1500s and 1600s provoked a growing revulsion among Europe’s intellectual elite against intolerance and sectarian violence. This, combined with the spreading awareness of the previous century’s scientific discoveries and progress, shaped a new way of thinking about the world. Less religious in its orientation with more emphasis on the accomplishments of man, the Enlightenment, through its major spokesmen, Frenchmen Voltaire, Diderot, Montesquieu and their many followers in western Europe and North America, stressed the importance of individual achievement, rational thought, happiness in this world not salvation in the next, and liberty.

Jamestown Journey: Bacon’s Rebellion

Lead: In the summer of 1676, the colony of Virginia, already locked in an Indian war, broke into the conflict later called Bacon’s Rebellion.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: Climactic historical incidents can sometimes act as a snapshot – of an era, a period, a personality. Few snapshots depict late 17th Century colonial Virginia as does Bacon’s Rebellion.