Savonarola I

Lead: In the Renaissance capital of Florence, Italy, the terrible and powerful voice of Fra Girolimo Savonarola was raised against corruption in both church and state. He also raised powerful enemies.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having helped create and nurture European civilization in the long centuries since the collapse of the Roman Empire, the Church of Rome by 1500 was the single unifying institution on the continent. Millions, high and low, saw in the Church the path to eternal salvation, worshipped in her precincts, contributed to her their treasure, and sought solace from a life that Thomas Hobbes would later describe as solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short. Despite the devotion of countless numbers, there was trouble in Zion. With clear justification, many considered the Church to be set at rot, absorbed by worldly obsessions, ensnared by political and military ambitions, hopelessly and morally bankrupt.

Suppression of Galileo II

Lead: Condemned in 1632, the Italian scientist was not given reprieve until 1993.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Galileo, the Italian mathematician and astronomer, believed along with the Polish scholar Copernicus' that the earth revolved around the sun. The Roman Catholic Church disagreed. It taught that the earth was the center of the universe and in 1616 told Galileo to cease and disist his teachings on the subject. In 1624 there was a new pope, he was a long time friend and protector of Galileo and the scientist thought that perhaps a personal appeal would bring him some relief. He felt that it was dangerous for the church to champion a position so vulnerable to scientific evidence, that if people found themselves convinced by proof of something that it was made a sin to believe, they would reject the church's teachings in other areas and perhaps even attracted to the new Protestant ideas coming from Martin Luther in northern Germany.

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Suppression of Galileo I

Lead: Few early scientists contributed as much to the understanding of the way the universe works as Galileo but in his lifetime he was not popular.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: Galileo Galilei was the son of a poor nobleman and destined for a medical career. Yet, while at the University of Pisa in northern Italy, he became fascinated with mathematics and by 1589 was teaching at the University level. Fairly early in his career, he came to believe the theory taught by the Polish mathematician Copernicus that the planets revolve around the sun, but was hesitant to teach this openly because of the almost universal acceptance of the older theory which placed the earth of the center of the universe.

 

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Susan B. Anthony II

Lead: Devoted to a succession of causes, Susan Brownell Anthony did not hesitate to challenge laws she felt were discriminatory.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the end of the Civil War, women's rights advocates renewed the struggle which had lain fallow as the North concentrated on saving the Union. In 1869, Susan Anthony and her associate Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed the National Women's Suffrage Association and a national newspaper, The Revolution, which in its short life vigorously addressed women's issues including problems they faced in the workplace. Despite the good reception Anthony was receiving around the country, it seemed to her that little real progress was being made, therefore she decided to take more direct action. In the elections of November 1872, she and a handful of women walked into the Rochester, New York registration office and demanded to be registered as voters. Four days later they cast their ballots, three weeks after that, Anthony was arrested.

Susan B. Anthony I

Lead: In a life devoted to various causes, Susan B. Anthony proved herself in many ways far ahead of her times.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Susan Brownell Anthony was born in 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts. Her father was a prosperous cotton manufacturer. A Quaker and an abolitionist, a man who hated alcohol, Daniel Anthony who gave his daughter a strict upbringing and demonstrated a zeal for moral crusading that Susan would follow for the rest of her life.