Mike King Finds His Calling

Lead: The triumph of evil is often assured in the absence of a leader who will help people do good.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was unseasonably warm that December night in 1956. Four thousand people spilled out of the packed Holt Street Baptist Church. A prayer was said, a scripture passage was read and then a young man stood to the pulpit and began speaking. When he was finished a new era had begun.

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Teapot Dome Scandal III

 Lead: In 1922 Interior Secretary Albert Fall leased to his friends oil-rich land in California and Wyoming. He was on the take.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Government experts suspected that oil was being drained from government land into private wells on the edge of national oil reserves in the west. To protect these reserves, oil was being pumped out under contract and resold to the government for above ground storage. In trouble financially, Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall in the spring of 1922 arranged private leases in exchange for cash, bond, and interest-free loans of $400,000 in cash or bonds.

Teapot Dome Scandal II

Lead: Trusted by his friend President Harding, Secretary of Interior Albert B. Fall brought disgrace to the administration and served time for his trouble.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1921 Interior Secretary Fall convinced Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby to transfer control of naval oil reserves to his Department. It was government policy to hold oil-rich land for national defense purposes. Since Navy ships were propelled by oil-fired engines it was in the national interest to hold this land in reserve. During war the oil could be pumped out for emergency purposes. Some Navy experts believed that reserves in places such as Elk Hills, California and Salt Creek, Wyoming were being drained by private oil wells on the edge of government land, and they insisted that this endangered reserve should be immediately pumped and stored above ground.

Battle of Hastings II

Lead: The Battle of Hastings was perhaps the most decisive fight in English History, but with a slight change in tactics, the English probably would have won.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Hearing the news that Edward the Confessor, the old king of England had died, William, Duke of Normandy prepared to cross the channel and take the Crown from the new King, Harold Godwinson. All during the summer of 1066 he assembled his fleet and waited for favorable winds.

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Battle of Hastings I

Lead: Most battles have little effect beyond the blood and pain of those involved. No can say that about Hastings.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: A generation ago it would have been hard to find a student who could not tell you the significance of year 1066. It was then in October that the forces of William, Duke of Normandy, crossed the Channel from France and defeated the English Army of King Harold before the coastal village of Hastings.

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Taj Mahal

Lead: On the Jumna River in the city of Agra, India, is the crowning jewel of Indo-Islamic architecture. Built by the emperor of India, Shah Jahan, the structure is one of the most elaborate works of art ever erected.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Jahan inherited the throne of India at birth and at a fairly early age met and fell deeply in love with a beautiful woman, Arjumrand Band Begun. As his favorite, Arjumrand bore many of the emperor's children and they lived happily until in 1631 she died during childbirth - her fourteenth in eighteen years. So devastated was Jahan by her death that he locked himself in his room for many days. When he emerged he sent for India's finest architects, sculptors and craftsmen. Construction started shortly after the queen's death and for more than a year twenty thousand people worked to complete her tomb. Finished in 1648 it is set in a huge rectangular park and towers 187 feet above the river.

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The Beer Hall Putsch

Lead: Adolf Hitler was very bitter when he left the army after World War I. He and many other Germans were angered by what he felt was betrayal on the part of those Germans who had arranged the Armistice ending the war and signed the Treaty of Versailles bring the peace.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The main focus of his malignant energy was the Weimar Republic, the government struggling to bring some semblance of democracy to a Germany many of whose citizens simply did not want it, and Hitler was one of them.

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The Seventh Member (of the German Workers Party)

Lead: In September, 1919 a 30 year old corporal in the 16th Bavarian Infantry Regiment was sent to spy out the meeting of a tiny political party. He was not impressed.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Twenty-five people sitting around in a bar listening to boring speeches. It was hardly a threat to the national interests and he reported that back to his superiors.

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