America’s Revolution: First Continental Congress III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In its work, the First Continental Congress had two major tasks before it. First, it had to develop a theoretical formulation of American rights, then it had to carve out a means of defending those rights. One would have thought that given the controversy surrounding the attempts of the British Parliament to extend control over the colonies during the past decades, that an ideology of American Independence would be immediately forth-coming, but delegates struggled to express just where the foundation of American rights lay. ‘Was it Nature,’ suggested Richard Henry Lee, ‘or the British Constitution or the colonial charters, or the general practice after 150 years of self-rule.’ A sub-committee was set to work to frame a statement of American rights and on October 14th, Congress adopted a Declaration of Rights which incorporated Lee’s tripartite source of colonial rights. Americans accepted royal supremacy, but rejected emphatically the right of Parliament to govern in the colonies.

America’s Revolution: First Continental Congress II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The delegates who arrived in Philadelphia for the meetings of the First Continental Congress were the cream of their colony’s leadership. Massachusetts and Virginia led the way and presented the highest in intellectual and social leadership. Virginians were especially impressive; ‘elegant with distinguished bearing.’ Ceasar Rodney of Delaware considered the lot of them, “more sensible fine fellows you would ever wish to see.”

America’s Revolution: First Continental Congress I

In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: During 1774 a significant number of Britain’s North American subjects had come to the conclusion that relations with the so-called “Mother Country” had reached a level of despair that required some kind of concerted effort at resistance. The Intolerable Acts, one of which closed the Port of Boston in response to the Tea Party, had infuriated a broad segment of colonial society. Even those most inclined toward continued efforts at reconciliation with Britain were despondent lest all their work would come to naught. Americans were coming to the conclusion that nothing they could do would bring Britain, both King and Parliament, to its senses and that unless the colonies acted in their own defense the corruption originating in London would spread to North America and that liberty would be forfeit.

A House Divided: Confederacy Triumphant II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By mid-1862 one of the serious problems facing the successful prosecution of the war in the North was a faction of the Democratic Party known as Copperheads, named first by Ohio Republicans for the venomous snake populating Southern swamplands. The growth of this Peace Democratic bloc reflected the misfortune of Union arms in that year of despair and serious opposition in the southern part of the states of the old Northwest to what many Democrats perceived as Eastern economic imperialism or as one Ohio newspaper railed, “….serfs to the heartless, speculative Yankees, swindled by his tariffs, robbed by his taxes, skinned by his railroad monopolies.”

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A House Divided: Confederacy Triumphant I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: If there was a time during the American Civil War in which the Confederacy might have laid a claim to triumph, it was the year between Robert E. Lee’s assumption of command of the Army of Northern Virginia in June 1862 and that Army’s destruction on the gentle slopes of Gettysburg the following summer. Except for the slaughter that was Antietam in September, Confederate forces realized one victory after another. This was not primarily due to a lack of determination and bravery on the part of Union troops, who were beginning to get the hang of this bloody war, but to the timidity and/or incompetence of the generals who led them into battle and down to defeat over and over and over again. Lee and his lieutenants out-generaled and out-maneuvered armies that were much larger and better equipped. He took the measure of his opponents and beat them or held them to strategic draws in battle after battle.

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Abuse of ADHD Drugs II

Lead: The increase in the diagnosis of children with A.D.H.D. has led to an increase in the abuse of the drugs used to treat the disorder.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: During the first two decades of the twenty-first century, children and young adults have presented Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (A.D.H.D.) in increasing numbers. The abusive use of those drugs used to treat A.D.H.D has seen a parallel increase during this period. Adderall, Adderall XR, Ritalin, and Vyvance are the primary medications in combatting the disorder as well as being the drugs of choice in enhancing recreational pleasure, academic and athletic performance. In the 2012 Stolz study almost 5% of eighth graders, 8.5% of tenth graders, and at least 10% of twelfth graders have used Adderall with or without a prescription. An estimated 25% of college students admit to an illicit use of the drug to help them focus on their academic work, particularly as they face end of semester deadlines. Often in the past students accessed University health clinics which were easier to engage than an outside psychiatrist, but as abuse has grown, Universities have become much more restrictive, making students undergo a lengthy process prior to prescription and including contracts promising not to sell or share their pills with friends.

Abuse of ADHD Drugs I

Lead: In recent years an increasing number of children have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (A.D.H.D.). With that increase has come abuse.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder. Scientists are not 100% sure of the cause of the syndrome but studies in the early 2000s have indicated that it is a malfunction in the frontal cortex of the brain which affects executive functions such as reasoning, planning, focusing, and problem solving. Dopamine, a neurotransmitter, has been determined to be deficient in people with A.D.H.D. Absent sufficient quantities of dopamine, a patient may have trouble with memory and task flexibility. Studies by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that a child affected by A.D.H.D. may daydream a lot or lose important items, make careless mistakes, overdo physical activity, talk a lot and have reduced social skills. Unfortunately, this diagnosis is rather vague since such characterize many young children not all of which are troubled by A.D.H.D. This imprecise analysis is made even more complicated because of the drugs that have typically been used to treat the syndrome; drugs that have led to abuse of near epidemic proportions.