American Revolution: Tea Partying I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: By summer 1773, the brief abatement in active colonial resistance to British taxation which had ushered a time of political calm since early 1771 came to a crashing end. Parliament, clearly incapable of political subtlety or of learning from its past mistakes, passed the Tea Act. This bit of economic pretense contrived to at the same time continue the revenue stream into governmental coffers at 3 pennies or pence per pound, aid the financially troubled East India Company which was given a monopoly on the tea trade to America, and most importantly signaled that it would have its way in the colonies regardless of native public opinion.

Conscription, A Confederate Paradox II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In spring 1862, with Yankee victories in the West and George McClelland’s huge 100,000 man juggernaut slowly creeping up the peninsula between the James and the York Rivers toward Richmond, Confederate fortunes never had seemed at such an ebb. Therefore, Jefferson Davis and the Confederate Congress instituted conscription, drafting into the rebel armies men between the ages of 18 and 35 who would not willingly re-enlist or volunteer for a term of up to three years. Davis could not seem to win for losing, however. His Confederate political enemies whom he affectionately called “snakes,” began to attack him as being worse than Lincoln, engaged in the acts of a tyrant.

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Conscription, A Confederate Paradox I

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Jefferson Davis called them cats and snakes and they snapped at him from all sides. The cats demanded that he pursue the Southern war effort with more enthusiasm and audaciousness. The snakes attacked him when he and the Confederate government did just that. With the depressing news of rebel defeats flooding in from the West and the attendant near-complete cutting of the Confederacy in two along the Mississippi, in spring 1862 the Davis administration forced through Congress two radical and most un-Confederate-like measures which set the snakes to a venomous roil, martial law and conscription. The latter proved to be the most controversial and the one that touched Southerners most directly. It was clearly a Confederate paradox.

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Kalashnikov Semi-Automatic Rifle II

Lead: Originally designed to help the Soviet army best the Germans in World War II, the AK-47 has become the weapon of choice for insurgent forces world-wide.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: An automatic weapon, in particular the AK-47, has a relatively simple operating mechanism. When a firing pin hits the cartridge primer, the exploding gunpowder creates a wave of gas which propels the bullet out of the barrel at enormous speed. Caught between the bullet and the cartridge, the gas builds up pressure because it has no place to go. Near the muzzle there is a small opening which bleeds off some of the gas into a tube above or below the barrel. The pressure of the gas in the tube pushes the bolt backward, ejecting the spent cartridge and opening the firing chamber to receive a fresh cartridge from the magazine which is pushed upward into the chamber by a spring. As long as the trigger is depressed, the process repeats itself over and over.

Kalashnikov Semi-Automatic Rifle I

Lead: The world’s greatest killing machine, with some 250,000 victims a year, is a Russian invention, the Ak-47, Mr. Kalashnikov’s semi-automatic assault rifle.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: At the high-point of Operation Barbarossa, Adolf Hitler’s ultimately disastrous invasion of Russia that began in 1941, units of the German Army were approaching the outskirts of Moscow. In September they arrived at Bryansk, a city buried in the forest along the Desna River southwest of Moscow. Nazi bombing nearly wiped out the town, killing more than 80,000. Nearly 200,000 were taken into slave camps.

Bruce Barton and Christian Capitalism

Lead: A preacher’s son in awe of his father’s philosophy, Bruce Barton combined hard work, consumer based advertising, liberal Protestantism and liberal Republican politics into the gospel of Christian Capitalism.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: From his father Barton learned the value of hard work. Though his family was a prosperous one, he was expected to work his way through college, first Berea, and then graduation from Amherst. He first tried journalism, but soon moved into advertising and became the founder of one of the most successful and prominent agencies, BBDO, with his partners Alex Osborn, Roy Durstine, and George Batten. Barton brought his clergyman father’s values of individual hard work and the virtue of prosperity. Consumers were encouraged to purchase more of their desires because it stimulated in them diligence and ambition.