Nat Turner Slave Rebellion II

Lead: Even as a child, people could tell Nat Turner was exceptional. His intelligence and physical presence marked him for leadership in the slave community of south-side Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Benjamin Turner owned a small plantation outside the town of Cross Keys in the Virginia county of Southampton, nestled on the North Carolina border 70 miles southeast of Richmond. His land was heavily forested and only about 100 acres were under cultivation. It was enough, however, for him to afford to keep slaves, the mark of status in the South, and in 1799 he bought a slave woman freshly arrived from Africa. He named her Nancy and in the next year she gave birth to Nathaniel.

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Nat Turner Slave Rebellion I

Lead: In August 1831 the southside Virginia county of Southhampton was convulsed by the deadliest slave rebellion in North American history. One of roots of the rebellion was Southern white ambivalence about slavery.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite the growing economic dependence upon slave labor in the American South after the Revolution, there was powerful ambivalence among many Southerners about the institution of slavery. It mocked the philosophical foundation of the republic itself, violating the principles animating the Declaration of Independence. Many religious groups were increasingly vocal about the immorality of slavery. Quakers, anti-slavery Baptists, and, before 1800, Methodists vigorously denounced the practice and encouraged slave owners to manumit their slaves. In the North, slavery was gradually eliminated by custom, sentiment, and legal prohibition, so that the South became increasingly isolated in the national debate.

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A House Divided: The Fall of Atlanta II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having pushed Confederate armies under Joseph Johnston back from the suburbs of Chattanooga to within 20 miles of his goal, the vital railroad and manufacturing hub of Atlanta, William Sherman was briefly stymied in late June at Kennesaw Mountain with heavy losses. Summer rains had turned the Georgia clay to muck in June, but by early July these roads had begun to dry. Sherman’s maneuver machine was back in business. He crossed the Chattahoochee River on July 9th and was at Peachtree Creek, four miles from the City, the next day. Panic struck the civilian population as Sherman’s relentless campaign seemed on the verge of success.

A House Divided: The Fall of Atlanta I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In Summer 1864 a sense of malaise and depression gripped the North as the fortunes of Federal armies seemed to flag. Not since the heady days of Confederate triumph in the winter and spring of 1862 and 1863 did the cause of the Union seem so hopeless. In many ways this was a product of war weariness after three years of almost constant conflict and a sense that the Union war strategy had bogged down in Georgia and Virginia, but also it grew from the effusion of blood that attended Yankee forces at seemingly every turn. The horrific slaughter at Cold Harbor had led to stalemate in front of Petersburg, and though Phillip Sheridan eventually rolled up Jubal Early in the Shenandoah Valley, that would not come until deep into the Fall.

American Revolution: Tea Partying III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The mass meeting ended on a note of resolution. The thousands gathered at the Old South Meeting House the evening of December 16, 1773, moved out into the street after hearing Samuel Adams denounce the Parliamentary Tea Act as an assault on colonial liberties. He demanded that the tea shipped into Boston by the monopolistic East India Company be sent back or destroyed.

American Revolution: Tea Partying II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Three ships rode at anchor alongside Griffin’s Wharf in Boston harbor awaiting delivery in early December 1773. They were packed with casks of tea bearing a three-cent-per-pound duty in a Parliamentary monopoly scheme to benefit the financially ailing East India Company. Boston, indeed all the colonies, were up in arms over the Tea Act which continued Britain’s determination to dominate colonial life.