Buffalo Soldiers II (African American Soldiers after the Civil War)

 

Lead: During the Indian wars, the Buffalo Soldiers, units made up of African Americans, served with great distinction.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Of the Native American clans who inhabited the West during the white settlement of the frontier, none were more resistant than the Apache. Unlike northern plains Indians, Sioux, Cheyenne, or Commanche, who fought mostly to keep miners, ranchers and hunters off their reserved territory, the Apache had lived for centuries alongside Spanish and then Mexican villages, sometimes attacking, sometimes trading with their white neighbors. They were consummate mountain guerrilla warriors, able to spring from ambushes with deadly effect and then cleverly elude their pursuers.

Buffalo Soldiers I (African American Soldiers after the Civil War)

Lead: Following the Civil War, U.S. Army regiments made up of African American soldiers proved themselves among the most efficient and professional fighting men in the Indian Wars.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the Civil War over 180,000 blacks served in volunteer regiments fighting with the U.S. Army. They filled out units and even comprised one entire corps, the 25th, which helped occupy Richmond in the closing days of the war. Despite valiant and faithful service in the face of great danger, no African American troops were allowed to serve in regular army units. That all changed in the summer of 1866 when four infantry and two cavalry regiments were created by Congress to be made up exclusively of black enlisted men. Most of their service was on the frontier where Indian opponents nicknamed them Buffalo Soldiers.

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Creation of the United Nations – II

Lead: Determined to avoid the mistakes of the League of Nations, the founding states of the United Nations met to draft a charter in San Francisco in the Spring of 1945.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the factors complicating the establishment of the United Nations was that its Charter provisions were hammered out when the primary concern of the founders was the defeat of the Axis. Nothing could be allowed to deter the Allies from this task. Therefore the negotiations proceeded with a certain delicacy.

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Creation of the United Nations – I

Lead: In October 1945, the victorious World War II Allies met in San Francisco to establish the United Nations. It was the 20th century’s second multi-purpose world-wide international organization and emerged from the failures of the first.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the charter members met in spring 1945, they were determined to steer clear of the fatal weaknesses that proved so damaging to the U.N.’s predecessor, the League of Nations. In many ways the failures of the League insured the success of the United Nations. The League came to grief in part because one of its great champions, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, despite a prodigious public relations campaign that probably undermined his health, failed to convince the Senate, led by conservative Massachusetts Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, to ratify the Versailles Treaty (1919) a section of which established the League. That meant the up-and-coming international power during the 1920s and 1930s would not be a full player in League debates or diplomatic efforts. The League also lacked an independent enforcement mechanism, and when Germany, Italy and Japan began their pattern of aggression that ultimately led to World War II, and the major Allies refused to act, the League was powerless and therefore discredited.

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