Peggy Marsh (Mitchell) Writes Her Book: Gone with The Wind

Lead: In the late 1930s a young woman from Georgia won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. It was her only book. She called it Another Day.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Peggy Marsh was an unreconstructed Southerner and held the Old South and its legends almost in reverence. She felt that twentieth-century generations were losing touch with the old ways and that the culture she revered was becoming all but lost. In the mid-1920s she resolved to write a book, a novel that would tell the story of the Old South.

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Marie Sklodowska Curie

Lead: Winner of two Nobel prizes, the French physicist Marie Curie, born Maria Sklodowska near Warsaw, Poland, helped advance the understanding of radioactive substances.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Learning was a lifetime passion for Marie Curie. Her parents lived and taught in a private school and as a child she demonstrated a remarkable memory in academic matters but hers was not a purely abstract scholarship. During Maria's childhood, her native Poland could not be found on the maps of eastern Europe. For centuries Polish territory had been parceled out to hostile neighbors and in 1863, due to an abortive revolt, Poland had become little more than a Russian province. The Polish language was suppressed. As a teenager she took part in the secret nationalist "free university" where she taught the Polish language to women workers.

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Emma Lazarus & The Statue of Liberty

Lead: At first reluctant, Emma Lazarus gave in and wrote the words that helped build the symbol of America's welcome.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The money wasn't coming in and Joseph Pulitzer was becoming very frustrated. Publisher of the New York World, a Hungarian immigrant who fought in the Civil War, Pulitzer had taken, as his personal crusade, the task of raising money to build the pedestal on which the colossus was to rest. The arrangement was that France would supply the statue if the United States would build the base. Work in Paris was on schedule but in America, people did not seem to be very concerned.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Advice to Lawyers II

Lead: As a leader, Abraham Lincoln was inspiring but was also quite practical.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Following his death, Abraham Lincoln became for many the fallen leader struck down at the moment of triumph. Former enemies, who never in his life had a single good thing to say about the man, soon forgot their animus and joined with the rest of the country in an attitude of near worship. All of which would have probably amused the former President, who had an unusually clear understanding of human frailty and the fickle nature of politics.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Advice to Lawyers I

Lead: Few Americans have excited the nation's admiration and respect as Abraham Lincoln. He also could be a very practical man.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Almost from the beginning of his career as a prairie lawyer, Abraham Lincoln was a success. Born in Kentucky in 1809, he migrated with his family to Indiana and then to Illinois. His self-education is the stuff of legend and he played with various occupations until settling on the practice of law. In 1836 he was sufficiently prepared to pass the bar and began his practice, first in New Salem then Springfield. He worked hard, followed the judges on their circuits, and soon was making a handy living. More than the judges, more than the Governor of the state.

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Flying Wedge: Football Tactic

Lead: On the last Saturday before Thanksgiving 1892 at Hampton Park in Springfield, Massachusetts, 21,500 fans watched the annual Harvard-Yale football game. After a scoreless first half, the Harvard team surprised its opponents with one of the most spectacular and controversial plays in football history. The "flying wedge" was born.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As it emerged in the late 19th century, the new American sport of football combined features of English rugby and soccer. Gradually, under the leadership of Walter Chauncey Camp who coached the Yale team from 1888 through 1892, the game adopted many of its distinguishing rules. Yet, from the beginning, football had a reputation for rough, even brutal competition. This was defended by many, including future President Theodore Roosevelt who wrote Camp in March, 1895 that he would not change the game's brutality. Football produced leaders and leaders can't be efficient unless they are manly. To him, rough football produced masculine vigor.

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C-Rations

Lead: They have survived brutal blizzards, blinding sandstorms fallen thousands of feet from planes and helicopters. Soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines both hated and loved their C-rations.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the 1930’s, the Army subsistence laboratories were given the responsibility of creating food rations that could survive perilous situations. Previously, water-and-flour wafers, something like biscuits, and bitter chocolate bars were the mainstay for soldiers in the field. Unfortunately, they were repulsive and often crumbled or melted in the heat.

 

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Du Pont’s Saltpeter Mission

Lead: In the fall of 1861, Lammot du Pont left on a secret mission. Federal stocks of saltpeter, used in making gunpowder, were running dangerously low.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By the summer of 1861, both Federal and Confederate leaders realized that the war was going to be a protracted conflict. Alarm began to fixate the planners in the War Department in Washington. Federal stocks of potassium nitrate, known as saltpeter, a substance essential to the manufacture of gunpowder, were evaporating. India, controlled by Great Britain, was the primary source of American supplies of saltpeter. Because the South provided many of the raw materials used in British factories, economic ties between Britain and the Confederacy were unusually strong.

 

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