Winston Churchill’s Iron Curtain Speech II (Start of the Cold War)

Lead: In March, 1945 Winston Churchill gave his famous "Iron-Curtain" Speech in Fulton, Missouri. It was not given as an idle gesture.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the days after World War II, the United States began to explore the path of accommodation with the Soviet Union. Under the new President, Harry Truman, and Secretary of State James F. Byrnes, America began to draw away from the British, who were increasingly isolated and under Soviet pressure in the Balkans, Iran and the Mediterranean. Truman was following the course laid out by his predecessor, Franklin Roosevelt, but as 1945 drew to a close, important elements of public opinion began to criticize this policy. Secretary of Defense James Forestall and other military leaders were fearful of Soviet power and expansion and urged the President to a more militant approach to the Russians. This was echoed by certain key Republicans such as Senator Arthur Vandenberg and influential shapers of opinion like Henry R. Luce, publisher of Time Magazine, and the editors of the New York Times.

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Winston Churchill’s Iron Curtain Speech I (Start of the Cold War)

Lead: On March 5, 1946 at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, Winston Churchill delivered one of the most important speeches in post-World War II history. It signaled the beginning of the Cold War.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: The alliance of necessity between the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union began to show signs of decay with the defeat of Germany in April, 1945. The traditional American isolationism and reluctance to be drawn into permanent foreign entangling alliances was, in the absence of an immediate perceived enemy threat, rearing its head. Americans were tired of war and many were not as fearful of growing Soviet power as were their British cousins. This tended to counter the pressure of those advisors surrounding the new and inexperienced President Truman who would have the United States take vigorous leadership in international affairs. Some close to the President actually advocated closer Soviet/American ties. All of this meant the British felt themselves increasingly out in the cold and under pressure from the Soviets in many places such Iran, the Balkans, and the Mediterranean.

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LFM: Sarah Edmonds, Civil War Spy

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Civil War Union spy Sarah Edmonds spent a good part of her life disguised as a man. In the Army she often disguised her disguise. Although women were not permitted to enlist as soldiers in either army during the Civil War, perhaps as many as 400 did so by bending their gender. In April 1861 Sarah Edmonds, after four attempts, was able to enlist in Flint, Michigan, as a male volunteer named Private Frank Thompson.

 

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1968: The Assassination of Robert Francis Kennedy II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: Coming off a difficult loss to Eugene McCarthy in the Oregon primary in late May 1968, Robert Kennedy had come to California with high hopes of getting back in the running. On primary day, June 5th, early afternoon exit polls showed Kennedy with an appreciable lead over his opponent and so at 6:30 the Kennedys left Malibu for Los Angeles anticipating a victory celebration. Kennedy, who had struggled to fill his slain brother’s shoes, spoke to a friend in Washington: “I feel for the first time that I’ve shaken the shadow of my brother. I feel I made it on my own”. Celebration headquarters was the Ambassador Hotel where they celebrated in a suite with the inner circle.

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1968: The Assassination of Robert Francis Kennedy I

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: In the wake of Eugene McCarthy’s unexpectedly strong showing in the March 1968 New Hampshire primary, Senator Robert F. Kennedy of New York, former Attorney General and brother of slain President Kennedy, seeing political opportunity, entered the race for the Democratic nomination. Approaching the contest with the energy that attended nearly all the enterprises of that generation of Kennedys, after several months of nonstop campaigning, he was beginning to show his age, a characteristic optimism tempered by weariness. He was now the patriarch of the extended Kennedy clan, plus he and Ethyl had a huge family of their own. On one occasion he told reporters “If I lose, I’ll go home and raise the next generation of Kennedys”. With 11 children he was well on the way to creating that on his own.

 

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Muslim Conquest of Spain II

Lead: Following the expansionist inclination of the Umayyad caliphate of Damascus, evangelical Islam by 714 had conquered almost all of the Iberian peninsula. In Spain they created a brand new society.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Disunity among Christians, powerful armies, and a sense of spiritual inevitability compelled the armies of God north through Spain and into central France. Everywhere Islam swept all before it. Not until the Christian Franks outflanked and defeated the Muslims at the first Battle of Poitiers in 732, did the Islamic tide recede and retreat.

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Muslim Conquest of Spain I

Lead: The expansion of Islam in the centuries after the Prophet Muhammad’s death flowed east to India and west to the Visigothic kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula. Spain had powerful Moorish rule for more than seven centuries.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: From 712 to 1492 some part of Spain was under Muslim control. At high tide, Arabs ruled almost all of Iberia. In the end, only Granada, dominated by the massive Alhambra fortress, could resist the Reconquista, the re-conquest of the peninsula, led finally by Christian forces united under Ferdinand and Isabella. The city surrendered in the year Spain turned its attention outward and sent Christopher Columbus on his journey to a new world.
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Marie Sklodowska Curie

Lead: Winner of two Nobel prizes, the French physicist Marie Curie, born Maria Sklodowska near Warsaw, Poland, helped advance the understanding of radioactive substances.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Learning was a lifetime passion for Marie Curie. Her parents lived and taught in a private school and as a child she demonstrated a remarkable memory in academic matters but hers was not a purely abstract scholarship. During Maria's childhood, her native Poland could not be found on the maps of eastern Europe. For centuries Polish territory had been parceled out to hostile neighbors and in 1863, due to an abortive revolt, Poland had become little more than a Russian province. The Polish language was suppressed. As a teenager she took part in the secret nationalist "free university" where she taught the Polish language to women workers.

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