Galveston Hurricane 1900 II

Lead: Winds raged at more than one hundred miles an hour. Houses were crumbling right and left. Flood waters stormed through the town. The Great Hurricane of September 1900 was paying a visit on Galveston, Texas.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Weatherman Isaac Cline, his wife, Cora, their three children and his brother Joe were all huddled in the family home when, suddenly, a streetcar trestle slammed into the side of the house causing their home to collapse. Joe and two of the children quickly escaped through a window. Joe called for his brother, but the other three were trapped against the chimney under the wreckage. Suddenly, the wreckage shifted and the little group was thrown upward, but that was hardly a comfort. A flash of lightening revealed one of Isaac’s daughters clinging to a piece of debris and his brother and other children in the distance. Cora was gone. The next few hours were a nightmare. At one point, the group was sucked out to sea. Screams punched through the howling winds. Acts of bravery were commonplace as residents pulled bodies from underneath crushing beams and helped others dodge falling electrical lines.

 

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Galveston Hurricane 1900 I

Lead: It was September 7, 1900. The citizens of Galveston, Texas slept peacefully unaware they were about to become actors in one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. History.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Weatherman Isaac Cline took a leisurely stroll admiring the colorful streets and sandy white beaches of Galveston, Texas. He had been in the resort town for eleven years and working for the U.S. Weather Service for 18. That Friday he had gotten some worrisome news. A major hurricane was headed his way. Strange. The sky was blue, and the barometric pressure had fallen only slightly.

 

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William Pitt the Younger

Lead: As it had leaders before and after him, the stubborn question of Ireland consumed William Pitt the Younger.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the last half of the 1700s, the name William Pitt dominated British politics. William Pitt the Elder helped save the country from defeat by France in the Seven Years War and his son of the same name brought together international coalitions to oppose the aggression of the French Revolution. But despite this record the thorny question of Ireland brought the younger Pitt's ministry to grief and his service to an end.

William Pitt the Elder

Lead: Like Winston Churchill, the first William Pitt might never have become leader had Britain not been losing the war badly.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Educated at Eton and Trinity College, Oxford William Pitt organized England's war effort and secured the beginnings of a vast overseas empire.

The Seven Years War with France opened in 1756 with a series of disastrous defeats for the British. The Mediterranean fleet was decimated in a battle off the island of Minorca. In India, a portion of the garrison was stifled in the notorious Black Hole of Calcutta. In North America, Native Americans and their French allies raided western settlements with impunity.

Augustine II

Lead: In AD 386 an official orator in the imperial city of Milan, Italy, Augustine, his intellectual system in tatters and his personal life in shambles, reached a life-changing conclusion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the ambitious new teacher of rhetoric arrived in the imperial capital, he paid a courtesy call on Ambrose, the local Christian bishop. The younger man was impressed with the Bishop’s demeanor, teaching ability and the honor in which the entire community held him. This encounter set in motion the steps leading to Augustine’s conversion to Christianity. He eventually became a priest and, in 395 Bishop of the City of Hippo a North African diocese in what is present-day Algeria.

Augustine I

Lead: One of the most influential thinkers in the history of Christianity was Aurelius Augustinius. He became a bishop, but his lifestyle was not always that of a devout believer.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The future Bishop of Hippo was born in the city of Thagaste or Souk Ahas, in Numidia, an ancient North African kingdom covering what is now Algeria. His family was socially prominent, but not particularly wealthy. From the beginning Augustine was a handful, a troublesome boy, given to cheating and physical combat, bright, but not very interested in his studies. He was the pride and the heartbreak of his young mother Monica, whose Christianity held little appeal to Augustine or his elderly father Patricius.

 

Two Flags Over Iwo Jima II

 

Lead: The taking of Iwo Jima was a blood bath on both sides, but the US Marines were inspired to even greater sacrifice when, on the fourth day of fighting, the Stars and Stripes appeared, as if by a miracle, over Mt. Suribachi.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It actually was two flags. At mid-morning February 23, 1945, 40 men from the 3rd Platoon, E Company, 2nd Battalon 28th Marine Regiment finished their long climb to the top of Mt. Suribachi, the extinct volcano dominating the skyline of the Pacific island of Iwo Jima. They had negotiated cliffs, tunnels, mines, booby traps and ravines all occupied by an entrenched enemy. A small US flag was attached to a steel pole and hoisted, for the first time, over Japanese home territory. Ship’s whistles sounded, Marines all over the island cheered and some shed tears in the midst of the enormous sacrifice required to take the island. Marine photographer Lou Lowery captured the event on film.

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Two Flags Over Iwo Jima I

Lead: While the invasion of Iwo Jima in February 1945 was not universally advocated, the Marines who landed there with their forfeit and blood made it an eternal shrine to courage and sacrifice.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the brilliant tactics of the US war in the Pacific in World War II was “island-hopping.” American forces would hop around an island deemed unessential to the war on Japan and heavily defended by the Japanese and move to better islands closer to the homeland from which air attacks could be launched. The Japanese defenders on islands hopped over would thus be cut off from supplies and support and left to rot until the war was over. Originally, Iwo Jima was a candidate for hopping. It had 22,000 Jap troops heavily dug in and thoroughly supplied.

 

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