Emancipation of Brazil’s Slaves

Lead: The abolition of slavery in Brazil was due in large part to the influence of two courageous but pragmatic rulers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brazil was one of the few Latin American countries to gain peacefully its independence from European rule. During Napoleon's invasion of Portugal in the early 1900s, its rulers fled to their South American colony. When the French were no longer a threat, the Portuguese monarchs left Prince Pedro in charge. In 1822 he declared the independence of the nation and himself Emperor of Brazil. The stability provided by the monarchy was largely unmatched in the region.

 


Justice Sandra Day O’Connor II

Lead: While she generally sided with the conservatives on the Supreme Court, at times Sandra Day O’Connor was fully willing to depart from orthodoxy. Consider her approach to abortion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The preamble to the 1986 Missouri law declared that “the life of each human being begins at conception.” It went on to severely restrict reproductive services at public hospitals and required costly tests to determine fetal viability if the woman appeared to be 20 weeks pregnant. This seemed to violate the core principles of Roe v. Wade the 1973 Court decision denying states jurisdiction over abortion and, thus permitting abortions prior to the third trimester of pregnancy. The lower courts eviscerated the Missouri law.

 


Justice Sandra Day O’Connor I

Lead: In 1981 President Ronald Reagan made legal history by appointing Judge Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court. The first woman justice, she soon occupied the center of the court.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: O’Connor was born in Texas in 1930 but grew up on her parent’s Arizona ranch. She was attracted to the law because of a legal dispute involving her parents’ property and graduated from Stanford Law School. As a student, she sat on the board of the Stanford Law Review, a prestigious position that, had she been a man, would probably have secured her a position in an upscale law firm. Such was not the case and she and a partner formed their own legal partnership. Active in Arizona Republican politics, she was appointed to a vacated seat in the Arizona Senate and served two additional terms, elected by her colleagues as majority leader. Appointment to the Arizona Court of Appeals in 1979 established her as one of the most prominent women jurists in the country. 

 


LFM Buffalo Soldiers: Black Soldiers on the Frontier

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Following the Civil War, U.S. Army regiments made up of African-American soldiers proved themselves among the most efficient and professional in the Indian Wars. During the Civil war over 180,000 blacks served in volunteer regiments fighting with the U.S. Army. They filled out units and even comprised one entire corps, the 25th, which helped occupy Richmond in the closing days of the war. Despite valiant and faithful service in the face of great danger, no African American troops were allowed to serve in regular army units. That all changed in the summer of 1866 when four infantry and two cavalry regiments were created by Congress to be made up exclusively of black enlisted men. Most of their service was on the frontier where Indian opponents nicknamed them Buffalo Soldiers.

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Juliette Low and the Girl Scouts

Lead: Born Juliette Gordon in Civil War Savannah, Georgia, the founder of the world's largest voluntary organization of young women, at last discovered an outlet for her restless energy.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Juliette's father was a wealthy Savannah cotton broker who left his young bride in 1861 to fight for the Confederacy. Her mother grew up in a pioneer Chicago home and was torn by those conflicting loyalties that beset so many families during that time. Two of her brothers died fighting for the Union and she entertained General Sherman after his famous march to the sea. It is said that little Juliette now known as "Daisy" sat on the General's lap during his visit.
 

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American Revolution: Who Pays the Piper III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1772 colonial Massachusetts was aroused from a period of political lethargy by the London government’s attempt to pre-empt local control of royal officials by paying their salaries through custom’s revenues rather than by the legislature. Samuel Adams and his allies formed a Committee of Correspondence to defend colonial liberty. They produced a powerful piece of propaganda to articulate the American position called the Boston Pamphlet.


American Revolution: Who Pays the Piper II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1772 the London government changed the way high royal officials in Massachusetts were paid. It sought to wrest power and a form of control from the colonial legislature by demanding that these officials be paid, not from appropriations by the General Court, but from customs revenues. This reawakened American anger and resistance as the payment of salaries was thought to be one way the colonials could keep the Governor and judges in line.


American Revolution: Who Pays the Piper I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: After almost a decade of struggle over taxing with its North American colonies, the authorities in London thought they had come up with a way of managing resistance to its revenue schemes. If they cut back on the amount and the specific taxes, this seemed to induce a state of torpor among the Americans and damped down the level of opposition. The problem was that the British never completely abandoned their campaign, insisting on unabridged Parliamentary sovereignty, and colonial resistance never completely died. One such maneuver in Massachusetts by London authorities in 1772 reawakened colonial displeasure in an escalation of events which would not end until America sought and achieved its independence.