Monticello: From the Master’s Hand

Lead: Perhaps no private residence in America reflects the tastes and disposition of its builder as does the home of Thomas Jefferson, Monticello.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The term "renaissance man" seems created to anticipate Thomas Jefferson. Lawyer, farmer, writer, philosopher, inventor, musician, politician, author of the Declaration of Independence, the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, and father of the University of Virginia, Jefferson was accomplished at each, seeming to equal the renaissance scholar's dream of virtue as the governing principle of life. When he built his home high on the little mountain near Charlottesville, he deemed it almost as a gesture of appreciation for all of life.

 

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First Ladies: Lucy Webb Hayes

Lead: Lucy Webb Hayes was the first presidential wife to graduate from college but in both attitude and action she was a traditionalist.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Rutherford B. Hayes met his wife at college. He was a young Cincinnati attorney, just starting out, and would attend Friday afternoon receptions at Wesleyan Female College. Lucy was sixteen when they first met and after a courtship of five years they married in 1852. From the beginning the Hayes gained the reputation as deeply religious people of Methodist orientation. The future President was a Civil War hero, having been wounded at the Battle of South Mountain. He served as a Republican Congressman from Ohio, but it was his balance and reasonable approach to rule during his term as Governor of Ohio that made him a compromise candidate in the bitterly disputed election of 1876. Southern whites had grown weary of Reconstruction, and when the Presidential election ended in deadlock and had to be decided in the House of Representatives, the Deep South led by Wade Hampton of South Carolina voted for Hayes against the Democrat Sam Tilden, who had won a majority of popular votes, because Hayes promised to pull federal troops from the four remaining Southern states under garrison and spend federal money to help the South rebuild its war-shattered economy.

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The Bowery

Lead: The Bowery, noted in legend and fact as a home, for New York’s alcoholics, prostitutes and the homeless, was originally Dutch colonial farmland.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the Dutch settled Manhattan in the 1600s, the land that runs diagonally from present day Chatham Square to the crossing of Fourth Avenue and Eighth Street was an Indian Trail. It led from the main area of settlement to a group of agricultural tracts prominent among which was Governor Peter Stuyvesant’s bouwerij, the Dutch word for farm. By the early 1800s it had become a well-traveled thoroughfare and in 1807 was named the Bowery.

 

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Emancipation of Brazil’s Slaves

Lead: The abolition of slavery in Brazil was due in large part to the influence of two courageous but pragmatic rulers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brazil was one of the few Latin American countries to gain peacefully its independence from European rule. During Napoleon's invasion of Portugal in the early 1900s, its rulers fled to their South American colony. When the French were no longer a threat, the Portuguese monarchs left Prince Pedro in charge. In 1822 he declared the independence of the nation and himself Emperor of Brazil. The stability provided by the monarchy was largely unmatched in the region.

 


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LFM Buffalo Soldiers: Black Soldiers on the Frontier

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Following the Civil War, U.S. Army regiments made up of African-American soldiers proved themselves among the most efficient and professional in the Indian Wars. During the Civil war over 180,000 blacks served in volunteer regiments fighting with the U.S. Army. They filled out units and even comprised one entire corps, the 25th, which helped occupy Richmond in the closing days of the war. Despite valiant and faithful service in the face of great danger, no African American troops were allowed to serve in regular army units. That all changed in the summer of 1866 when four infantry and two cavalry regiments were created by Congress to be made up exclusively of black enlisted men. Most of their service was on the frontier where Indian opponents nicknamed them Buffalo Soldiers.

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Juliette Low and the Girl Scouts

Lead: Born Juliette Gordon in Civil War Savannah, Georgia, the founder of the world's largest voluntary organization of young women, at last discovered an outlet for her restless energy.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Juliette's father was a wealthy Savannah cotton broker who left his young bride in 1861 to fight for the Confederacy. Her mother grew up in a pioneer Chicago home and was torn by those conflicting loyalties that beset so many families during that time. Two of her brothers died fighting for the Union and she entertained General Sherman after his famous march to the sea. It is said that little Juliette now known as "Daisy" sat on the General's lap during his visit.
 

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Trent Affair II

Lead: On Christmas Day 1861, Abraham Lincoln summoned his cabinet to diffuse an international crisis that threatened to bring the United States and Great Britain to war over the Trent Affair.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early November of that year two Confederate emissaries, James Murray Mason of Virginia and John Slidell of Louisiana, en route to England, were arrested when the British mail packet Trent was ordered seized by the captain of a Union warship USS San Jacinto. The Confederates were imprisoned in Boston, and the British government demanded their immediate release on the grounds that the Union warship had violated international maritime law.

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Trent Affair I

Lead: In early November 1861, a diplomatic incident involving the United States and Great Britain, brought the two near to the brink of war.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The incident, known as “The Trent Affair,” began when a Union warship, U.S.S. San Jacinto, intercepted a British mail steamer, Trent, on route from Havana, Cuba to England. Aboard the Trent were two Confederate emissaries, from Virginia, James Murray Mason and from Louisiana, John Slidell. After slipping through the Union naval blockade on the Gulf coast, they made it to Cuba, where they boarded the British vessel Trent. Mason and Slidell were bound for England and France, respectively, seeking diplomatic support for the Confederacy.

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