Catherine the Great & Assassination of Peter III I

Lead: From relatively obscure beginnings, Sophie Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst, married her powerful appetites to ruthless ambition and became Catherine the Great.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was her fortune to be connected in her mother’s line to one of the premier houses of Germany, the Dutchy of Holstein. This gave her rank and eligibility among upwardly mobile 18th century European aristocrats. Her family played well the game of marriage intrigue and Sophie ended with one of the great prizes. She was betrothed to the grandson and heir of Czar Peter the Great of Russia. The young man, Karl, who later took the name Peter III, was one of history’s truly accomplished nit-wits. He never realized that intellectually he had married above his station.


Wit of President Abraham Lincoln

Lead: Of the weapons available to the politician, among the most powerful is humor. No one was better at wielding that weapon than Abraham Lincoln.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Few politicians can survive if they become an object of laughter and ridicule. On the other hand, those seeking office who have the ability to use humor as a weapon against opponents or as a means of giving themselves a more sympathetic and down-to-earth image go a long way to winning to the support and perhaps the affection of the electorate. A sense of humor is not required for election, but it helps, both to soften the blow of losing or even better, to keep political success in correct perspective.

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Blackout

Lead: At 5:15 PM on November 9, 1965 most of the northeastern United States went dark. The cause? Not a terrorist attack. Not incompetent workers. Not a huge natural disaster. The great blackout was caused by a small metal relay doing exactly what it was supposed to do.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The powergrid of a modern industrial nation is a highly complex and intricate creation. Different regions demand power at different levels at different times. As a result power is often consumed at great distances from the place it is generated. One city may have a huge demand at the same time that another's requirement is relatively meager. The power network is set up to divert surplus electricity from light demand areas to those where the needs are greater.

 

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A Moment in Time Capsule 1970: The Beatles Disband

Lead: It almost seemed impossible. A world grown accustomed to Beatlemania would have to reconcile itself to reality. In early 1970 the Beatles, the most popular rock group in history, broke apart.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Almost from their beginnings as a group in working class Liverpool, England and Hamburg, Germany, The Quarrymen, who later changed their name to The Beetles or the Beatals or Johnny and the Moondogs or Long John and the Beetles, or The Silver Beatles, but by August 1960, The Beatles, pushed the edge of rock music. At the core of the group were John Lennon, George Harrison, and Paul McCartney. Other artists had played with them, but they would emerge internationally soon after mid-1962 after they were joined by drummer and occasional soloist, Ringo Starr.

 

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign III

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Spotsylvania is remembered as some of the most intense, bloody fighting of the American Civil War. It gained that reputation because neither of the armies would turn aside or give in. The fighting was up-close, personal, hand-to-hand, nigh onto atavistic, territorial, frenzied, and cruel.

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: West of Fredericksburg, Virginia is a dreary stretch of scrub oak and pine known as the Wilderness. There at Chancellorsville, a year before, Robert E. Lee had virtually executed Joseph Hooker’s Army in perhaps Lee’s most spectacular victory of the war, but Ulysses Grant was no Hooker. He crossed the Rapidan with 115,000 men and plunged into the Wilderness fully aware that Lee would try his magic once again. On May 5, 1864 Lee pitched into Grant’s flank, but in savage fighting in the smoke-clouded woods the two armies fought to a standstill.

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A House Divided: Overland Campaign I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: President Lincoln would say it later but he understood a fundamental fact as spring turned to summer 1864. “Upon the progress of our arms, all else chiefly depends.” His re-election, emancipation and the restoration of the Union would not at any point be achieved by negotiation. In his message to Congress outlining discussions with Jefferson Davis that lamentable summer, he wrote that “Davis does not attempt to deceive us. He cannot voluntarily reaccept the Union, we cannot voluntarily yield it. Between him and us the issue is distinct, simple and inflexible. It is an issue which can only be tried by war, and decided by victory.

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End of US Slave Importation II

Lead: The issue was whether the U.S. Constitution would permit the continued importation of slaves. They came up with a compromise, but on the long-term future of slavery it was largely fruitless.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until its complete abolition at the end of the Civil War, slavery was a moral, legal, and economic sore that festered on the American body politic. Once slaves had become an integral part of the colonial economy and social fabric in the 1600s, it would be a source of great reward and great offense. As the delegates gathered in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 to craft a better way of building national unity, the problem of slavery reared its terrible head. Divisions were on predictable lines, Northerners wanted to bring the practice to an end, Southerners wanted to protect their interests. Yet, surprisingly, even Southerners were aware that the institution had deleterious effects on the character of slave and slave-holder, violated the principles on which the new republic was founded, and was becoming economically unprofitable.

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