The Doctors Mayo

Lead: On December 12, 1879 the Rochester, Minnesota "Record and Union" announced that the first telephone line in town had been set up between Dr. Mayo's farm and his office above Geisinger and Newton's Drug Store. Another innovation by the founder of the most famous medical family in United States history.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: William Worrall Mayo was born in 1819 at the beginning of a decade of great political and social discontent in Manchester, England. While serving as a medical apprentice in Glasgow he met a young post-graduate physician from Philadelphia who re-enforced in Mayo the desire to seek a future in the United States rich, and distant with room to spare for an ambitious young man.

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American Revolution: Boston Massacre IV

Lead: As the years passed, the story of the so-called Boston Massacre grew with the telling.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When Crispus Attucks and four other men were killed by British soldiers on the cold, clear night of March 5, 1770, the news enflamed a Commonwealth of Massachusetts already hostile to presence of the troops. The soldiers were in Boston to maintain order, to intimidate colonial leaders who were reluctant enforce the laws of the Crown, and to assist in the collection of taxes imposed by the government of King George III to help pay for the defense of the colonies. Bostonians and many other Americans hated those taxes imposed "without representation," and took out their resentment on the troops sent to collect them.

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American Revolution: Boston Massacre III

Lead: On the cold, clear night of March 5, 1770, Private Hugh White stepped on the pages of history. His silly argument with 16-year-old Edward Garrick, a wigmaker's apprentice, led to the so-called Boston Massacre.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: White's regiment had been sent to maintain order in a Boston, Massachusetts increasingly resistant to the tax schemes of the British Crown. He was walking duty in front of the Customs House on King Street and the argument with Garrick ended by White striking the boy with the butt of his musket. A crowd gathered and began to threaten the soldier.

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American Revolution: Boston Massacre II

Lead: One of the flashpoints in the long run-up to the American Revolution was the Boston Massacre.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Strapped to pay for a very expensive victory in the Seven Years War, Britain began in 1763 to tax its North American colonies. It seemed very reasonable. The mother country had spent millions defending the colonies from the French and their Native American allies. A slight tax on imports was a small enough price to pay for a peaceful frontier and oceans free for colonial shipping, but many Americans did not feel that way. The taxes and the writs of assistance, those general search warrants used by royal agents to invade the merchant's privacy and collect the taxes, were considered illegal. Tensions escalated as Americans condemned this so-called "taxation without representation."

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American Revolution: Boston Massacre I

Lead: The so-called Boston Massacre helped push Americans toward independence.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is hard to believe but as late as 1770 most people living in the colonies of North America were no more than loyal subjects of the British Crown. Except for a few radicals, most Americans considered themselves ordinary faithful Englishmen who just happened to live 3000 miles to the west of the Irish Sea. In just six short years a Congress of the colonies had declared independence and was raising an army to banish the rule of King George III from the colonies forever. What was behind such a change?

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Arthur Ashe

Lead: Even as a youth growing up in Richmond, Virginia, tennis legend Arthur Ashe refused to be blocked from pursuing his dreams and broke through physical and racial barriers to achieve them.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Tennis player, author, and social activist, Arthur Ashe, was born in the capital of the former Confederacy in 1943. Segregation was king and blacks were second-class citizens. Even after federal courts had brought an end to legal segregation, the insidious poison of social bigotry remained all across the country, but especially in the South. Not only were talented African Americans denied equal opportunity in education, business and social institutions, but ironically at the time, also in sports and recreation.

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Teapot Dome Scandal III

Lead: In 1922 Interior Secretary Albert Fall leased to his friends oil-rich land in California and Wyoming. He was on the take.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Government experts suspected that oil was being drained from government land into private wells on the edge of national oil reserves in the west. To protect these reserves, oil was being pumped out under contract and resold to the government for above ground storage. In trouble financially, Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall in the spring of 1922 arranged private leases in exchange for cash, bond, and interest-free loans of $400,000 in cash or bonds.

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Teapot Dome Scandal II

Lead: Trusted by his friend President Harding, Secretary of Interior Albert B. Fall brought disgrace to the administration and served time for his trouble.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1921 Interior Secretary Fall convinced Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby to transfer control of naval oil reserves to his Department. It was government policy to hold oil-rich land for national defense purposes. Since Navy ships were propelled by oil-fired engines it was in the national interest to hold this land in reserve. During war the oil could be pumped out for emergency purposes. Some Navy experts believed that reserves in places such as Elk Hills, California and Salt Creek, Wyoming were being drained by private oil wells on the edge of government land, and they insisted that this endangered reserve should be immediately pumped and stored above ground.

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