American Revolution: Gaspee Incident I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The early 1770s proved to be a time of diminished tension between Britain and the North American colonies. In an attempt to reduce points of contention the London government repealed all import taxes from the 1767 Townshend scheme save for the three pence per pound tax on tea. The plan worked generally, but colonial resentment still remained on a slow simmer because Parliament did not disclaim its right to tax when it reduced the number of commodities in the revenue structure. This irritation did not prevent colonial merchants from engaging in a veritable orgy of trade with Britain nearly doubling their volume in the three years after 1771 in comparison to the three before. Even in Boston, the cockpit of colonial resistance, merchants held their noses and brought in a half million pounds of dutied tea.

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Daniel Boone Part II

Lead: In 1775 frontiersman Daniel Boone established a wilderness road, which became the gateway to the west during the sixty years following the American Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Contrary to popular myth, Daniel Boone was not the first American pioneer to explore Kentucky. Boone, however, did establish a pathway through the mountains that made possible increased settlement in the west. The Cumberland Gap is a natural pass in the Appalachian Mountains on the border of Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. At an elevation of 1600 feet, the cut was made by an ancient stream six hundred feet into the highlands. The pass was discovered in 1750 by Dr. Thomas Walker, a Virginia agent for the British Loyal Land Company. Dr. Walker simply followed a trail (called the Great Warrior’s Path) that the Native Americans had used for centuries. He named it for the son of King George III - the Duke of Cumberland.

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Daniel Boone Part I

Lead: In 1734 Daniel Boone, perhaps the most well known American pioneer, was born near present day Reading, Pennsylvania. He was the sixth of eleven children.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Boone family were hard-working Quaker farmers. Daniel grew up learning to hunt, trap and survive on the land – skills that would make him a consummate survivor on the American frontier. Like most pioneer children, he did not attend school but was taught to read and write by a family member, in his case, an aunt. When Daniel was about sixteen, the Boones sold their farm in Pennsylvania and resettled in the Yadkin River Valley of North Carolina, a journey that took the family over a year.

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US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets III

Lead: In September 1972 the United States lost the basketball final to the Soviets in one of the most disputed games in the modern Olympiad.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the closing minutes of the game the United States was ahead because of a shot made by Doug Collins who then tackled probably on purpose by a Soviet player. During the free throws, apparently, the Soviet coach had tried to call a time-out, but that was against the rules. Despite this, the refs, in of the sport’s most controversial calls, gave the Soviets the time out and a second chance. They were unable to score even with the added time. The American contingent was apoplectic with joyful celebration.

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US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets II

Lead: In the final game of the 1972 Summer Olympic basketball competition, the Soviet Union’s team won but under circumstances that remain questionable to many even to this day.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Politics are never very far from the Olympics. Nations use the games and their athletes to prove the superior worth of their political and social systems. During periods of high tension like the cold war, antagonists such as the United States and the Soviets, opponents in other arenas, economic, political and military, sought to use the Olympics as an extension of warfare to the track, the swimming pool, the parallel bars and, in 1972, to the basketball court.

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US Olympic Basketball Team Loses to Soviets I

Lead: In a heart-breaking and controversial final result, the 1972 U.S. Olympic Basketball team lost to the Soviet Union. The game remains a subject of bitter dispute to this day.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The 1972 Olympic Games in Munich were supposed to be the happy games. They were designed by West Germany to erase the memory of the 1936 Hitler games with all their overt Nazi propaganda and the terrible aftermath of war and Holocaust. Such was not to be. On September 5th, eight terrorists from Black September, a Palestinian organization linked to Fatah, broke into the Olympic village and took nine Israeli Olympians hostage in their apartments. Eighteen hours later the crisis came to a climax and eventually ended in a failed rescue attempt at a nearby military airfield. The tragic deaths of all the Israelis cast a pall over the summer games which, despite the hostage incident, Olympic officials declared must continue.

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Lucrezia Borgia II

Lead: At the pinnacle of the so-called Renaissance papacy and symbolic of its corruption was the clan Borgia. Lucrezia Borgia, the illegitimate daughter of Pope Alexander VI, was either a victim of the family’s venality or a major perp or maybe even both.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until late in the modern period, aristocratic marriages were alliances, not just for love or for the production of children, but designed to enhance the position of both families in the match. The Borgia marriages were particularly strategic. Lucrezia was the youngest surviving child of Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia and his mistress Vannozza.

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Lucrezia Borgia I

Lead: Lucrezia Borgia was either one of the most immoral women in history or she was a pawn in the never-ending game of late Italian Renaissance family intrigue. Or maybe she was both.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the heart of late Italian Renaissance brilliance, culture, and corruption was the family Borgia. This clan, whose members exploited an already decayed Catholic moral structure and who defined the era's worldliness and ambition, originated in Spain.

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