America’s Revolution: The Bishop’s Palace II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The religious affiliation of most Americans was not inclined toward the Church of England. They were evangelicals or liberals or perhaps not even religious at all and enjoyed in America a rich tradition of religious freedom. Many of their ancestors had migrated to North America to escape what they sensed was hostility to their approach to religion in the government of England and Scotland as administered by the Anglican Church. The structure of hierarchy in that Church aroused little enthusiasm among colonists who were generally unsympathetic to establishments of any type. Such was part of the American DNA.

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America’s Revolution: The Bishop’s Palace I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In 1770 Lord North became King George III’s First Minister. He was a gentle soul with a determination to tamp down on colonial disputes. His government quickly repealed all of the Townshend revenue acts, leaving only a tax on tea and the Declaratory Act to remind the colonies that Parliament was determined to retain its right to extract revenues. This ushered in a period which some at the time called a “pause in politics,” with no giant issue animating colonial anger and resistance. That is until there was one. That was the issue of religion.

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Charlie Chaplin

Lead: Few people have left a greater impression on the development of the motion picture business than Charles Spencer Chaplin. He is considered by many to be the greatest comic artist of the screen.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Charlie Chaplin got started in vaudeville. Born in London before the turn of the twentieth century, Chaplin grew up in an acting family and by the age of 12 he was on his own, performing in music halls all over England. On a tour of North America in 1913, he was signed by Mack Sennett of Keystone Films to work in comic pictures at a significant increase in salary. He never looked back.

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Margaret Sanger – Prophet of Birth Control

Lead: The cause of birth control found one of its most vigorous advocates in Margaret Sanger.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Margaret Sanger was the sixth of eleven children. Born in 1883, her life dream was to be a physician, but despite an excellent college record, circumstances required her to choose a career in nursing. Service in the poorer sections of turn of the century New York City brought her into contact with some of society’s most severe social afflictions, yet later she recounted that her life was really changed when she treated Sadie Sachs. After several problem pregnancies, Sadie’s doctor had warned her that another would threaten her life. He told her to start sleeping on the roof. Sadie died a painful death in the fall of 1912 trying to terminate another unwanted pregnancy and Margaret Sanger embarked on a crusade.

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Golda Meir

Lead: One of Israel's strongest leaders was a little girl from Milwaukee, Goldie Mabovich.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Born in Kiev, Ukraine, Goldie emigrated with her family to Milwaukee in 1906. She attended the Teacher's Seminary but was soon attracted to politics and became a leader in Milwaukee's Labor Zionist Party. In 1921 with her husband Morris Myerson, she went to live in Palestine. For a time they tried the communal life of a kibbutz but finally abandoned it. Their two children were born in the early 1920's in Jerusalem while the couple scratched for a living, he as a carpenter, she as a washerwoman. The siren call of politics brought Goldie into the General Federation of Labor and during the 1930's, she rose in prominence and political position.

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Compromise of 1833 IV

Lead: Conflict over a protective tariff almost produced Civil War in the United States in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Angered over protective tariffs which benefited Northern industry and hurt Southern farmers, Southerners, led by United States Vice-President John C. Calhoun of South Carolina in the early 1830s, advocated nullification. If states were convinced the Federal government had passed laws that were unconstitutional, they could nullify them, declare them inoperative inside their state's boundaries.

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Compromise of 1833 III

Lead: The debate over a protective tariff nearly brought the United States to Civil War in 1833.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the late 1820s, Northern manufacturers wanted a high tariff to protect their businesses from foreign competition. Southern farmers despised protective tariffs. They wanted free trade to buy cheaper goods from Europe and to discourage other countries from imposing retaliatory tariffs which made it harder to sell Southern rice and cotton overseas.

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Compromise of 1833 II

Lead: In late 1832 the state of South Carolina declared that it had the right to nullify or ignore Federal law within its boundaries.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At its heart, the U.S. Constitution was a compromise, more precisely, it was a series of compromises, between rural and urban areas, between small states and large ones, between those living on the frontier and maritime interests on the coast, between slaveholders and those opposed to this institution and embarrassed by its glaring violation of the nation's ideals.

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