The London Blitz II

Lead: In the nine months of the London Blitz, the capital of Great Britain absorbed 20,000 tons of bombs, endured thousands of civilian deaths, and saw one in six Londoners lose their homes. It only made the English tougher.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Their plan was to destroy the Royal Air Force to prepare for a cross-channel invasion, but Hitler and Goering largely failed and turned to bombing civilian and industrial targets in central and southern Great Britain. London was the main object of their fury and for nine months, Germany rained death and destruction on the precincts of the City, particularly the impoverished districts of East London where were located the docks and industrial installations of commercial activity. According to author Peter Stansky, “the Blitz marked an introduction of modern terror on a large scale.” There was no such thing as the Home Front anymore. Everyone was at risk. It was a new type of warfare.

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The London Blitz I

Lead: Frustrated because his bombers and fighters could not destroy the Royal Air Force and its support structure, Adolf Hitler, in Fall 1940, turned all of his fury on the City of London.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Like Napoleon before him, hubris and ambition drew Hitler into consideration of a cross-channel invasion of Britain. To do this he had to eliminate the Royal Air Force and challenge the British Navy. All during the summer of 1940 Luftwaffe squadrons hammered away at the airfields of southern England and the aircraft factories that supplied the RAF with its deadly Spitfire fighters. Yet it seemed that the more the Germans tried, the more heroic and desperate became the efforts of those Churchill praised with the words, “never in the field of conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

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History’s Turning Points: Huckleberry Finn II

Lead: Historical study reveals twists in the human journey. Consider the continuing controversy over The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The publication of Huckleberry Finn was greeted with howls of derision by readers and institutions accustomed to the Romantic style of narrative. The author, Mark Twain, was a devotee of literary Realism, a movement within American and European literature that emerged after the Civil War and extended into the twentieth century. It may be defined as “the faithful representation of reality.” Authors such as William James, Rebecca Harding Davis, and Twain attempted in their writings to describe the lives and language of their characters as they really were. By the middle of the twentieth Huckleberry Finn was being hailed as a milestone in American literary progress.

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Charlie Chaplin

Lead: Few people have left a greater impression on the development of the motion picture business than Charles Spencer Chaplin. He is considered by many to be the greatest comic artist of the screen.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Charlie Chaplin got started in vaudeville. Born in London before the turn of the twentieth century, Chaplin grew up in an acting family and by the age of 12 he was on his own, performing in music halls all over England. On a tour of North America in 1913, he was signed by Mack Sennett of Keystone Films to work in comic pictures at a significant increase in salary. He never looked back.

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Margaret Sanger – Prophet of Birth Control

Lead: The cause of birth control found one of its most vigorous advocates in Margaret Sanger.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Margaret Sanger was the sixth of eleven children. Born in 1883, her life dream was to be a physician, but despite an excellent college record, circumstances required her to choose a career in nursing. Service in the poorer sections of turn of the century New York City brought her into contact with some of society’s most severe social afflictions, yet later she recounted that her life was really changed when she treated Sadie Sachs. After several problem pregnancies, Sadie’s doctor had warned her that another would threaten her life. He told her to start sleeping on the roof. Sadie died a painful death in the fall of 1912 trying to terminate another unwanted pregnancy and Margaret Sanger embarked on a crusade.

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LFM U.S. Leaves Vietnam

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: FLASH MARTIN TO SCOWCROFT. PLAN TO CLOSE MISSION AT ABOUT 0430 30 APRIL LOCAL TIME. DUE TO NECESSITY TO DESTROY COMMO GEAR, THIS IS LAST MESSAGE FROM EMBASSY SAIGON.

 

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1968: Paris Student Riots II

Lead: Perhaps no private residence in America reflects the tastes and disposition of its builder as does the home of Thomas Jefferson, Monticello.

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: In spring 1968, led by Daniel Cohn-Bendit, called Dany “le rouge” for his flaming red hair and left of center politics, radical students came from all over the country to Paris to take on the government of Charles de Gaulle.

 

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The Last Full Measure – Cu Chi Tunnels of Vietnam I

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time (is presented by the people of _________ and) is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: Connecting Phnom Penh, Cambodia to Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, Highway Number One meanders along the coastline of Vietnam until it reaches Hanoi in the north. Just few miles west of the former capital of the South, the highway bisects one of the most contested provinces of the two wars for Vietnam. Cu Chi province lies on the piedmont or Mekong terrace, between the dry foothills of the central highlands and the rich swampy rice fields of the Mekong Delta. One of the few places in South Vietnam where troops and armor could operate nearly all year long, it was like a dagger pointed at the heart of the South’s nerve center.

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