Voyage of Magellan II

Lead: In 1519 Ferdinand Magellan sailed from the port of Seville in Spain. Three years later one of his ships returned, having circumnavigated the globe. Such a voyage was possible because of a revolution in the technology of exploration.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: That Europeans should increasingly find themselves on shores far from home came about as a result of advances in the design of ships, expansion in the understanding of navigation and a sea change, as it were, in the way overseas exploration was financed.

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Voyage of Magellan I

Lead: On August 10, 1519, Ferdinand Magellan, a Portuguese sailing master of noble upbringing in service to the King of Spain, set sail on one of history's greatest voyages of discovery.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1400 Europeans knew little more than the Romans about the rest of the world. The tantalizing stories brought back by exploring merchant traders such as Marco Polo told of an advanced civilization in the Far East. This served to stimulate the European imagination but did little to expand contacts with a much wider world.

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Flying Blind (Autopilot)

Lead: If the airplane was ever to become more than an object of sport or tool of war, it had to be flown at night and in bad weather.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The enormous potential for aviation was beginning to be felt in the early 1920s but flying at night and during bad weather was hazardous and unreliable and posed serious limitations on the airplane in carrying cargo and passengers. Planes could compete with the railroads because of their speed but trains were far more reliable and in the case of mishap did not bounce as high. Often aviators would be caught in fog or lose sight of the ground at night, become disoriented, lose control of their aircraft, and crash, more often than not with fatal consequences.

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American Revolution: Colonial Non-Importation III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Trying to devise a means of expressing their opposition to taxation without parliamentary representation, Britain’s North American colonists resorted to an old tactic which had worked during the Stamp Act crisis of 1765-1766: they stopped importing British goods. After the repeal of the Stamp Act and the Sugar Act, Parliament then turned right around and passed the Townshend taxes on commodities such as glass, paper and tea. The non-importation movement took a long time to catch on as merchants and traders were reluctant get involved in such a coercive campaign because it would hurt their business. Yet, by the summer of 1768 the circumstances in the colonies were gradually becoming more and more ominous.

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American Revolution: Colonial Non-Importation II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the aftermath of the Parliamentary passage of the Townshend revenue acts in 1767, the American colonies were slow to react even though increasingly offended by what many felt were continued violations of the British Constitution. One of the tools available to the colonists was the non-importation of British goods. It seemed this had worked to secure the repeal of the Stamp tax three years before, perhaps it would work against the Townshend duties as well.

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American Revolution: Colonial Non-Importation I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: From the beginning the North American colonies were designed to serve as an integral part of the British economics system. Not unlike other European colonial outposts in the modern era in Asia, Africa and elsewhere in America, these British possessions provided raw materials for industry in the home country and customers for finished goods produced there. A elaborate system of bi-directional trade organized by the various Navigation Acts even governed the manner in which merchandise was conveyed, insisting that all trade must be transported in British bottoms, the quaint reference in that era to ships.

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History’s Turning Points: Black Death II

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. Among history’s turning points: Consider the results of the Black Death.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the arrival of the bubonic plague in the 1340s, the people of Europe did not know what was consuming them. This ignorance spawned great acts of courage and compassion, particularly among the clergy, but also near barbaric brutality. Many people blamed the Jews, specifically for poisoning the drinking water. Christian civility went out the window and thousands of Jews were murdered. According to one source, 16,000 were killed in 1349 in Strasbourg alone. Many fled to Poland where in the 20th Century their descendants would be consumed in another Holocaust of human origin.

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History’s Turning Points: Black Death I

Lead: Historical study often helps reveal twists in the human journey. We examine history’s turning points: Consider the Black Death.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In early October 1347, a ship left the city of Caffa in Southern Russia, bound for the Sicilian port of Messina. Along with its cargo it played host to its usual compliment of migratory black rats. They in turn were infested with tiny fleas bearing the deadly bacillus, identified finally in 1800s as pasteurella pestis, the bubonic plague.

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