Elizabeth Vigee LeBrun

Lead: In 1778, young French portrait painter Elisabeth Vigee LeBrun was summoned to Versailles to become the court painter of one of the most fascinating figures of French history—Queen Marie Antoinette.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Marie Louise Elizabeth Vigee LeBrun was born in Paris in 1755. She received art lessons from her father. She was largely self-taught at a time when female artists were denied admittance to art academies. By age fifteen, Vigee LeBrun had demonstrated such skill that she able to help support her widowed mother and brother. At the age of 20, at the insistence of her mother, Vigee LeBrun married their landlord, Jean Baptise Pierre LeBrun, an art dealer and artist. By copying many of the fine works around her, she later recalled that she “received the best lessons I could have attained.”

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Voyage of Magellan IV

Lead: Seeking a passage through the American land mass as a short cut to the rich spice islands of East Asia, Ferdinand Magellan and a crew sailed south along the coast of South America in the early months of 1520, looking for strait to take them through.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: While wintering in San Julian, a harbor in present day southern Argentina, three of his captains led a mutiny that threatened the expedition, but Magellan ruthlessly suppressed it, killing one leader, beheading another and leaving the third stranded on the beach. The rest of the mutineers Magellan wisely pardoned.

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Voyage of Magellan III

Lead: Commissioned by King Charles I of Spain to find a short cut through the Americas to the islands of southeast Asia, Ferdinand Magellan in command of five ships left the Spanish port of Seville in August, 1519. Thus began one of history's greatest voyages of exploration.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Prior to the voyages of Columbus beginning in 1492 and the systematic exploration of Africa by the Portuguese in the 1480s and 90s, Europeans had little accurate information about the earth's size. Their knowledge was based on the theories of the second century Greek writer Ptolomy who underestimated it. Because of this geographers were convinced that Japan and China lay only a few thousand miles west of Europe. Columbus's trips proved those estimates to be wrong. With the first accounts of Vasco de Balboa who reported finding a new Pacific Ocean on the other side of the new world in 1513, it appeared that the earth was quite large indeed.

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Voyage of Magellan II

Lead: In 1519 Ferdinand Magellan sailed from the port of Seville in Spain. Three years later one of his ships returned, having circumnavigated the globe. Such a voyage was possible because of a revolution in the technology of exploration.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: That Europeans should increasingly find themselves on shores far from home came about as a result of advances in the design of ships, expansion in the understanding of navigation and a sea change, as it were, in the way overseas exploration was financed.

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Voyage of Magellan I

Lead: On August 10, 1519, Ferdinand Magellan, a Portuguese sailing master of noble upbringing in service to the King of Spain, set sail on one of history's greatest voyages of discovery.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1400 Europeans knew little more than the Romans about the rest of the world. The tantalizing stories brought back by exploring merchant traders such as Marco Polo told of an advanced civilization in the Far East. This served to stimulate the European imagination but did little to expand contacts with a much wider world.

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Flying Blind (Autopilot)

Lead: If the airplane was ever to become more than an object of sport or tool of war, it had to be flown at night and in bad weather.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The enormous potential for aviation was beginning to be felt in the early 1920s but flying at night and during bad weather was hazardous and unreliable and posed serious limitations on the airplane in carrying cargo and passengers. Planes could compete with the railroads because of their speed but trains were far more reliable and in the case of mishap did not bounce as high. Often aviators would be caught in fog or lose sight of the ground at night, become disoriented, lose control of their aircraft, and crash, more often than not with fatal consequences.

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American Revolution: Colonial Non-Importation III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Trying to devise a means of expressing their opposition to taxation without parliamentary representation, Britain’s North American colonists resorted to an old tactic which had worked during the Stamp Act crisis of 1765-1766: they stopped importing British goods. After the repeal of the Stamp Act and the Sugar Act, Parliament then turned right around and passed the Townshend taxes on commodities such as glass, paper and tea. The non-importation movement took a long time to catch on as merchants and traders were reluctant get involved in such a coercive campaign because it would hurt their business. Yet, by the summer of 1768 the circumstances in the colonies were gradually becoming more and more ominous.

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American Revolution: Colonial Non-Importation II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In the aftermath of the Parliamentary passage of the Townshend revenue acts in 1767, the American colonies were slow to react even though increasingly offended by what many felt were continued violations of the British Constitution. One of the tools available to the colonists was the non-importation of British goods. It seemed this had worked to secure the repeal of the Stamp tax three years before, perhaps it would work against the Townshend duties as well.

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