Shanghai

Lead: During the nineteenth century, if a ship captain found himself short of sailors, he might have to make up his crew by shanghaiing.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: One of the important irritants that led to the War of 1812 between Britain and the United States was impressment. A British Captain, short of sailors, would stop an American merchant ship, sometimes at gunpoint, land a party of toughs, and drag off a few unwilling Yankee sailors to fill up his own crew. Despite the part this practice played in bringing on the war, at the time of the peace negotiations, very little was said about it. Britain, an island nation, had to maintain a superior Navy. Long tradition and ancient laws permitted the Royal Navy to force sailors into service by any means possible. After the war, impressment faded as an issue, but the practice continued, by mid-century acquiring a more colorful name, shanghai

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PT Boats – Mighty Mites of WW II – II

Lead: During World War II, pound for pound the PT Boat was the most heavily armed ship in the U.S. Navy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: Patrol Torpedo boats, or as they were known, PT boats were often the first line of offense for the Allies in the dark early days of World War II in the southwest Pacific. They were powerful, swift and sleek, packing a punch out of all proportion to their size. A PT squadron extracted General Douglas MacArthur from beleaguered Corregidor Island in the spring of 1942, and before larger ships were present in sufficient numbers they harried Japanese shipping and naval units. Like search and destroy missions in Vietnam, each night, squadrons of PT boats would head out to sea and audaciously attack anything that moved.

 

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PT Boats – Mighty Mites of WWII – I

Lead: Sleek and fast, the PT Boat often proved itself the first line of offense to the beleaguered Allies in World War II.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The patrol torpedo boat or as it was known simply, the PT boat, was the happy fusion of streams in the evolution of speed-boating. First, in these low-lying craft were placed massive marine engines, three Packard V-12 power plants, boasting 1250 horsepower each. These could drive a fifty-two ton boat at more than forty knots hour after hour in the most extreme weather and sea conditions. Second, this propulsive force was enclosed in a hull constructed of mahogany timbers held together by a spruce and oak superstructure so resilient that the little boats could withstand occasional complete submerging and once in a while jump into full flight above the surging current.

 

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Malcolm MacLean: Container King

Lead: The Ideal X moved out into the current from its birth in Port Newark, New Jersey. For Malcom MacLean it was a dream realized.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Malcom MacLean was a trucker. His first truck went on the road in 1931. Years of hard work and innovation enlarged that truck into a fleet of many hundreds. As the decades passed, MacLean grew adept at devising ways of getting around transportation bottlenecks. One of the most severe impediments to the shipment of goods was at the point where products were changed from one mode of transportation to another: from wagon to railroad, from railroad to barge, from barge to truck, from truck to ship.

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