PT Boats – Mighty Mites of WW II – II

Lead: During World War II, pound for pound the PT Boat was the most heavily armed ship in the U.S. Navy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: Patrol Torpedo boats, or as they were known, PT boats were often the first line of offense for the Allies in the dark early days of World War II in the southwest Pacific. They were powerful, swift and sleek, packing a punch out of all proportion to their size. A PT squadron extracted General Douglas MacArthur from beleaguered Corregidor Island in the spring of 1942, and before larger ships were present in sufficient numbers they harried Japanese shipping and naval units. Like search and destroy missions in Vietnam, each night, squadrons of PT boats would head out to sea and audaciously attack anything that moved.

 

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PT Boats – Mighty Mites of WWII – I

Lead: Sleek and fast, the PT Boat often proved itself the first line of offense to the beleaguered Allies in World War II.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The patrol torpedo boat or as it was known simply, the PT boat, was the happy fusion of streams in the evolution of speed-boating. First, in these low-lying craft were placed massive marine engines, three Packard V-12 power plants, boasting 1250 horsepower each. These could drive a fifty-two ton boat at more than forty knots hour after hour in the most extreme weather and sea conditions. Second, this propulsive force was enclosed in a hull constructed of mahogany timbers held together by a spruce and oak superstructure so resilient that the little boats could withstand occasional complete submerging and once in a while jump into full flight above the surging current.

 

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