GI Bill of Rights

Lead: Originally conceived as a way of keeping unemployed ex-servicemen off the streets, the GI Bill transformed the campuses of American colleges.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Fearful that returning veterans would not be able to find jobs after World War II, Congress passed the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944. The main feature of the bill was a provision for unemployment benefits at the rate of $20 per week for a year. Almost as an afterthought, the bill's sponsors tossed in a section guaranteeing any qualified veteran the chance to attend college for 48 months, at least in part, at government expense.

Read more →

The Parthenon

Lead: Etched on the Athenian skyline, the Parthenon has been subjected to abuse by a succession of regimes, but throughout, even in ruin, it has retained a profound elemental dignity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the formal cessation of hostilities between the city-states of Greece and their Persian antagonist in 449 BC, the citizens of Athens and their formidable leader, Pericles, returned to pursuits of peace. He wished to make Athens a center of culture and intellect and began with a comprehensive program of construction and refurbishment. Pericles’ first project was a magnificent new structure that would dominate the Acropolis, the magnificent Temple of Athena or Parthenos.

 

Read more →

Booth’s Preview

Lead: Six weeks before he killed President Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth had a perfect opportunity to strike.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: It is indeed a remarkable photograph. The scene: the United States Capital on March 4, 1865. Photographer Alexander Gardner made several exposures of Abraham Lincoln taking the oath in his second Inauguration. One of the plates was damaged, a smudge appeared right over Lincoln, and the tall, gaunt figure of the President is obscured. The crowd is gathered closely around, filling every available space in front of the incomplete Capital Building.

 

Read more →

New York City’s First Subway

Lead: New York needed a subway. Alfred Beach was ready to supply it.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1870 the need to move people quickly around the City of New York was apparent to all. The streets were clogged with pedestrians and horse-drawn vehicles and the steam and smoke put out by locomotives. Alfred Ley Beach, editor of the Scientific American and an inventor in his own right, had been experimenting with pneumatic propulsion, the use of air pressure to force a cylinder through a tightly sealed tube.

Read more →

American Revolution: Boston Rises IV

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: For the royal officials responsible for governing Massachusetts and collecting those taxes on imports decreed by the London colonial establishment, the problem was not so much their day-to-day duties in the late 1760s, but the broader issue of collapsing royal and social authority in America. The maintenance of law and order seemed to be on the downward curve of a slippery slope. They were most alarmed by the attitude of Americans which conjured up visions of the anarchy that swept across Britain during the English Civil war in the previous century, prior to the restoration of royal rule and aristocratic dominance. Claims to have government by the people and mob rule seemed to prevail everywhere they looked and this endangered the survival of traditional forms of governing.

Read more →

American Revolution: Boston Rises III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Perhaps one of the most pitiful players to emerge from the conflict between Britain and the colonies in the 1760s was Massachusetts Royal Governor Francis Bernard. A mild-mannered bureaucrat, he was caught between the demands of an increasingly obstinate London establishment and the political reality in a colonial constituency that was slipping far beyond his control. By the early months of 1768 Bernard had been on the job for nearly a decade though the political deterioration really began to accelerate with the passage of the Sugar and Stamp taxes and the intense reaction to them.

Read more →

American Revolution: Boston Rises II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Sam Adams was born in 1722 and attended Harvard. Though a convinced Calvinist, he declined to enter the ministry and followed his father into business, though he never demonstrated an aptitude for commercial success. He was an accomplished politician and agitator whose political base was the Caucus Club, an organization made up of artisans, tradesmen, doctors and lawyers formed to influence the elections of the Town meeting. During the Stamp Act crisis, the Caucus Club gradually merged into the Sons of Liberty. Adams became a powerful leader in this group and served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives and eventually as Governor. He was sent to the Second Continental Congress where he signed the Declaration of Independence along with his second cousin, John Adams.

Read more →

American Revolution: Boston Rises I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania (1767) may have produced a sense of satisfaction among many in the colonies weary of conflict with Britain and anxious to do nothing, but in Boston, on the front lines of said conflict, they produced no such lethargy. It seemed as though the London authorities had fixed their attention on Massachusetts as the center-point of all things seditious in the colonies and many Bostonians were happy to return the compliment. The arrival of the newly designated Customs Commissioners added fuel to the flames of resentment already aroused by the passage of the Townshend import taxes on lead, paper, glass and tea. The dispatch of British troops to occupy the city virtually guaranteed an explosion.

Read more →