Stamp Act Repeal III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Horace Walpole, son of Britain’s First Minister, Robert Walpole, a man of letters and member of Parliament from the rotten borough of Castle Rising, wrote, in his memoirs of the reign of King George III, that repeal of the Stamp Act before any serious attempt at enforcement and collection, stuck in the throats of a resentful and reluctant Parliamentary majority. “When do princes bend,” he opined, “but after a defeat?” His was a perceptive observation. Parliament did not like it, but First Minister Lord Rockingham who took over after the author of the Stamp Act, George Grenville, was removed by the King, faced a situation in America tantamount to open revolt and demands from a domestic constituency horrified by a severe downturn in commerce caused by a drop in American consumption of British goods. England’s merchants were up in arms and Rockingham recognized that he had a political alliance that could divert the debate from constitutional issues of Parliamentary and colonial rights, and push it the direction of practical economic survival. He used the near irresistible political pressure from the influential business community to secure repeal.

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Stamp Act Repeal II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: George William Frederick, King George III of Great Britain and Ireland, in a remarkable 60-year reign presided over the loss of Britain’s first great empire and helped lay the foundation for its next. Nevertheless, his reign was punctuated with long periods in which his hand on the tiller of the ship of state could best be described as tentative. He had health problems. He had mental problems. And he was too often whip-sawed by national and international crises complicated by personal insecurities and a weak leadership style.

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Stamp Act Repeal I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Though it was proceeded and followed by far more consequential revenue acts originating in the British Parliament, the Stamp Act was perhaps the most significant of these measures because of the reaction it provoked in the North American colonies. Beginning with the Patrick Henry-authored Virginia Resolves in late spring 1765, resistance and revulsion, sometimes quite violent, particularly in Massachusetts, spread outward from the Commonwealth. This antagonism demonstrated for the first time a unity of common oppositional spirit among the colonies to this obvious violation of one of the premier foundations of the British Constitution, namely, that no one should be taxed unless represented in the taxing body, hence no taxation without representation.

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Black Sox I

Lead: America was just about begin its "return to normalcy" under Warren Gamaliel Harding when in the fall of 1920 a Chicago Grand Jury indicted eight White Sox players for throwing the 1919 World Series in what became the Black Sox Scandal.

Tag: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1919, the Chicago White Sox were one of the finest teams in the history of baseball. The team's talent was in depth with excellent batting and several positions covered by more than a single outstanding player. In left field was Joe Jackson, one of the game's great hitters. On the mound spit-ball specialist Eddie Cicotte alternated with Claude "Lefty" Williams for pitching honors. They romped through American League during the season and were highly favored to beat the lack-luster National League contenders, the Cincinnati Reds. However, in one of baseball's most sensational reverses, the White Sox had lost. Even before the first game rumors were flying that the fix was in and that several White Sox players had conspired to throw the series.

 

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