American Rescue Squad

Lead: Despite the growing sophistication of modern medical practice and technology in the 20th century, delivery of care still lagged. Providing that link, usually on a volunteer basis, was the Rescue Squad.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: In late spring 1909, nine-year-old Julian Wise stood on the bank of the Roanoke River in southwest Virginia and watched two men drown when their canoe collapsed. The incident stuck in his mind, and looking back, he resolved that he would never again watch a man die when he could be saved. In 1928 he helped found the Roanoke Life-Saving and First Aid Crew. His idea was unique in that rescue, first aid, and life-saving were combined into a single volunteer organization. The group mostly sat on their hands for several years until 1931 when they successfully revived a drowning victim after reaching the scene in only 11 minutes. Soon interest began to grow with Wise traveling to cities in the central south helping them to establish clubs of their own. His work was featured in a Reader's Digest article and by 1959 800 squads were in operation around the world.

 

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Stamp Act III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The author of the Stamp Act (1765) and the Sugar Act (1764) was George Grenville, but his time as chief minister was cut short. Apparently he embarrassed and thus displeased King George III in a Parliamentary dispute over the Queen Mother’s membership in a Regency Council set up to conduct royal affairs in the case of the King’s death or incapacity. His replacement was Lord Rockingham, ably assisted by his secretary Edmund Burke, member from Bristol whose sympathy for the Americans was well-known. The Rockingham ministry enjoyed weak support in the House of Commons, but perhaps its greatest accomplishment was the repeal of the Stamp and Sugar Acts.

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Stamp Act II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The Stamp Act of 1765 was marked by an eruption of civil unrest theretofore unheard of in America. In colony after colony, stamp collectors were burned in effigy and then forced to resign their commissions, sometimes before even receiving them. Shipments of the stamped paper were destroyed. Alleged supporters of the Stamp levy found themselves threatened by mob action and their property put at risk. In August Lt. Governor Thomas Hutchinson’s beautiful brick home in Boston was methodically taken apart by a mob and everything moveable was stolen. They even ripped up the slate roof. From New Hampshire to George opponents of the Act took exquisite pains to demonstrate their revulsion to Parliament’s action. Widespread calls for a boycott of British goods began to gather support and soon a marked decline in cross-oceanic business activity began to pinch merchants and manufacturers in the mother country.

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Stamp Act I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: George Grenville, Chief Minister to King George III, was trying to manage a looming British financial crisis, but primarily was looking for money to pay for British troops based in America. Having levied a tax on the molasses used to make colonial rum, he wanted more money. Therefore, in 1764 he began hinting that Americans should pay for the paper used to transact legal business in the colonies. No such official dealings could be conducted on paper not bearing a governmental stamp. The government would sell the paper to the colonists and by this raise money for the troops. Colonial representatives were beyond emphatic that this stamp tax would be met with resentment and resistance. Grenville even toyed with the colonies by seeming to seek their input on the method of collection, but in the end it became clear that he was just being disingenuous and was determined to levy the stamp tax no matter what.

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Franklin Buchanan

Lead: The Civil War brought the naval career of Franklin Buchanan to an abrupt halt.

 Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: In the annals of the United States Navy, the service of few officers equals in luster that of Franklin Buchanan. A native of Maryland he went to sea when he was fourteen years old. When the Southern states seceded in 1861, the sixty-year-old Buchanan already had a distinguished and memorable career. He planned the organization of the United States Naval Academy and from 1845 served as its first superintendent. He was executive commander of the Navy's first major steam-powered warship, the Mississippi, and commanded the flagship of Commodore Oliver C. Perry in the 1853 expedition to Japan. On that voyage Buchanan acted as chief negotiator in the talks which helped open Japan to Western commerce. At the outbreak of hostilities before the Civil War, he was in charge of the Washington Navy Yard and watched with apprehension the departure for Confederate service of officers at whose side he had served for decades.

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St. Patrick II

Lead: Sometime after the year 431, a priest named Patrick began one of the most successful exercises in religious history.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: The priest known to us today as Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, spent six years in Ireland as a boy after Irish raiders kidnapped him in Britain and then sold him into slavery. He escaped from Ireland and eventually returned to his native Britain where he received a rather primitive monastic education and became a priest.

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St. Patrick I

Lead: In the waning years of the Roman Empire, a young boy from Britain was kidnapped and enslaved in Ireland – an event that would change the course of religious history.

 Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 Content: One of the world’s most successful Christian missionaries was born about 389, probably in southwestern Britain. His name was Patrick, and his father was a prominent landowner and community leader. He was brought up in a Christian environment, but not one noted for its piety. It was a time of great stress and historical transition. The Roman Empire, which for centuries had provided political, commercial and military cohesion for western Europe, was disintegrating.

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Eleanor of Aquitaine II

Lead: Turned out by one royal husband, the King of France, Eleanor of Aquitaine married his rival, the future King of England.

 Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

 Content: Strong and independent, Eleanor resisted at each stage of her career the role of quiet docile wife. After a stormy fifteen years in 1152, Louis VII of France had their marriage annulled. Their four daughters remained with the King and Eleanor was sent home to Poitiers a very eligible lady, possibly the richest woman in Europe. Within two months she was married, this time to Henry Plantagenet, the namesake and grandson of the King of England who was at that time pressing his claim to inherit the Crown. A successful invasion of England and the death of his chief rival yielded him the throne. Henry and Eleanor became King and Queen of England in December 1154.

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