Jamestown Journey – Whiskey Rebellion II

Lead: In 1791 to pay off war debts, the Federal government passed a excise tax on whiskey. It almost restarted the Revolution.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: The tax was imposed to pay off a huge national debt incurred when the colonies fought for independence. President Washington and Congress, at the urging of Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton hoped to raise revenue with a tax on whiskey. The problem was that many frontier farmers, too far away to ship grain east and unable to store grain before it rotted, converted it to liquor. For them it was almost like cash.

 

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Jamestown Journey: Whiskey Rebellion I

Lead: The new United States need to pay off its war debt and so congress levied an excise tax on whiskey. It got a rebellion.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: Alexander Hamilton had a problem. As George Washington’s Secretary of the Treasury he was responsible for paying off the enormous debt run up by the colonies in their eight year long bid for independence. $54 million doesn’t sound by today’s standards, but in those days it was an onerous burden for the young republic.

 

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Eadweard Muybridge: Photographer

Lead: Working in the United States, English photographer Eadweard Muybridge laid the foundation for the invention of Edison’s motion picture camera.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Eadweard Muybridge was born in Surrey, England, Kingston on Thames in 1830. He immigrated to the United States in 1852 and settled in San Francisco where he worked in publishing and bookselling. After sustaining a head injury in a stagecoach accident in 1860, Muybridge recuperated in England and returned to San Francisco six years later. He took up photography and captured the imagination of the international public with his stunning photographs of Yosemite Valley, panoramic images of San Francisco and his photographic surveys (commissioned by the U.S. government) of remote regions of the newly purchased vast territory of Alaska.

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Jamestown Journey: Compromise of 1833 II

Lead: Conflict over a protective tariff almost produced Civil War in the United States in 1833.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time, with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

 Angered over protective tariffs which benefited northern industry and hurt southern farmers, southerners, led by United States Vice-President John C. Calhoun of South Carolina in the early 1830s, advocated nullification. If states were convinced the Federal government had passed laws that were unconstitutional, they could nullify them, declare them inoperative inside their state's boundaries.

 

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Jamestown Journey: Decision, April 1861 I

Lead: The election of Abraham Lincoln in November 1860, set the course of secession, but the decisive decision did not come until April 1861.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: During the 1850s, an increasing number of southern partisans had come to the conclusion that state sovereignty and the institution of slavery could no longer survive within the Union. The numbers were then beginning to work against the South. The white population of the North was increasing exponentially. Within the South’s failsafe institution, the U.S. Senate, the number of senators opposed to the spread of slavery was increasing with the addition of each new territory. When Kansas was at last admitted as a free state after years of turmoil and bloody conflict, the handwriting was on the wall. The election of Abraham Lincoln, a man unreservedly opposed to the spread of slavery, convinced many Southerners, indeed most stubborn that the time had come to leave.

 

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Betsy Ross, Entrepreneur

Lead:      Though probably alien to her in that era, if the word entrepreneur does not describe Elizabeth Griscom Ross Ashburn Claypoole, the woman we know as Betsy Ross, who does it describe?

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Defying her parents and the Quaker community, Philadelphian Elizabeth Griscom, called “Betsy,” eloped in 1773 with Anglican John Ross. Both were apprentice upholsterers. The Rosses’ established a home and upholstery business on what was then Mulberry Street in Philadelphia.  At marriage, Betsy was not pregnant, though thirty percent of American pregnancies between 1761 and 1800 were “short-term” or pre-marital conceptions.

 

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Jamestown Journey: England and Virginia, the Bands that Break I

Lead: Angry at a series of what they considered oppressive parliamentary acts, Virginians in the early 1770s, began to resist.

Intro.: Dan Roberts and A Moment in Time with Jamestown - Journey of Democracy, tracing the global advance of democratic ideals since the founding of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607.

Content: Two-Penny, Stamp, Declaratory, Townshend. All names of parliamentary revenue statutes that gradually set colonial blood to boil. In 1769 the Virginia House of Burgesses protested the plan to try in England those colonists accused of treason, the Royal Governor dissolved that body. This prompted an alarmed George Mason to write of England “these are the bands, which, if not broken by oppression, must long hold us together, by maintaining a constant reciprocity of interests.” These bands were stretching to the breaking point.

 

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LFM: Armed Forces Radio

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro: A Moment In Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During World War II Armed Forces Radio was a welcome reminder of home to the lonely GI. It is a legacy of the war that entertains and informs service men and women to this day. In 1942 allied forces began to assemble for the Normandy invasion in bases throughout the English countryside. For many this was the first time away from home and they missed it.

 

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