Sacco and Vanzetti II

Lead: Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti emigrated to America to find a better life. The transition to their new home proved a difficult one.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Nicola Sacco came from a prosperous farm family in southern Italy. He arrived in the United States when he was seventeen and married Rosina in 1913. He was a hardworking shoe repairman who spent much of his spare time in his garden often giving excess produce to poor families in the area. He became attracted to the cause of anarchism and during World War I he fled the country to avoid the draft.

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Sacco and Vanzetti I

Lead: The trial and execution of two Italian immigrants in the 1920s exposed important fault-lines in the social fabric of twentieth century America.
Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: On April 15, 1920, F.A. Parmenter, paymaster of a shoe factory in South Braintree, Massachusetts and his twenty-eight year old security guard, Alessandro Berardelli were robbed and murdered during a routine transfer of payroll funds. Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were arrested, tried, convicted, and eventually executed for the crime. That authorities settled on this pair said less about their guilt, which remains in dispute to this day, than it does to the circumstances surrounding their prosecution.

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Wit of Franklin Roosevelt (FDR)

Lead: One of the frequent targets of Franklin Roosevelt's wit were his political opponents, particularly hapless Republicans.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Few would accuse FDR of excessive humility. His ego and self-confidence were enormous. They had survived a rocky marriage, electoral defeat, years in the political wilderness, and above all, the deep depression after poliomyelitis gave him a pair of almost useless legs. His supreme confidence in the face of adversity was a powerful source of encouragement to many in a nation people felt was handicapped by the Great Depression. One of the ways he lifted peoples’ spirits was through humor. Often the targets of his humor were conservative Republicans.

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Seneca Falls Convention

Lead: In July 1848 a group of activists met in Seneca Falls, New York and launched the Women’s Suffrage Movement.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Founders of the United States left two great matters of unfinished business. Slavery and whether women would have rights equal to that of men. The first would require a great war to resolve, the second a long struggle involving great sacrifice and political pressure. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott met in 1840 at the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London. They had been involved in the abolitionist movement in the United States, but found in London they shared another common concern, the rights of women. At the convention they could not join their husbands on the convention floor because they were females, but instead had to remain behind a curtained partition as they listened to the proceedings. Their time together in London produced a friendship and a determination to help remove the barriers to women’s full participation in American political and economic life.

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Francis Marion, Swamp Fox III

Lead: Using hit-and-run tactics, Francis Marion and his partisan militia, kept the British off balance in the South during the American Revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After the Patriot defeat at the Battle of Camden in August 1780, the cause was kept alive by guerrilla partisans. The most successful of these bands was led by Francis Marion. Like the morning mist, he and his troops would suddenly appear in lighting attacks that steadily eroded British strength and morale. At first the raids astonished the Brits, then they grew angry. Major James Wemyss was sent after Marion’s band, but when he could not find them, cut a path of destruction through the Carolina low-country, seventy miles long, at times fifteen miles wide - crops destroyed, livestock slaughtered, plantations leveled. In the mistaken belief that all non-Episcopalians were Rebels, Wemyss burned many Presbyterian churches. Then General Clinton declared that those who remained neutral in the fight were considered enemies of the British crown. Thus, wanton destruction and foolish politics helped swell the ranks of the partisans. Operating from his base deep in the Pee Dee swamp on Snow’s Island in the southeastern corner of present-day Florence County South Carolina, Marion made full use of the new recruits.

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Francis Marion, Swamp Fox II

Lead: After the British victory at the Battle of Camden in August 1780, the Revolutionary cause in the South was kept alive by Partisan guerrilla groups, the most notorious of which was led by Francis Marion.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After Camden the Patriots for a time could not field an Army that was able to defeat the British, therefore the cause was maintained by militia groups organized by Carolinians Francis Marion, Thomas Sumter, and Andrew Pickens, and a small unit from Virginia led by Light Horse Harry Lee. Marion was the most successful and best remembered. Before the war he was a plantation owner, of Huguenot descent, serving in the state legislature. He rose to command his own unit. At times his racial mixed band numbered in the hundreds, at others his forces dwindled to only a few dozen. They lived in the swamps of the Pee Dee River in northeastern South Carolina, sniped at the Redcoats and their Loyalist allies, attacked baggage trains, and harassed patrols.

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Francis Marion, Swamp Fox I

Lead: In 1780 the fleeting hopes of American Independence were kept alive by in the South by partisan guerrillas.
Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: From the opening of hostilities at Lexington and Concord in 1775 until signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the Revolution was America's longest war until the Vietnam conflict. While tension between Loyalist and Patriot sympathizers continued throughout the former colonies, active fighting for the most part had shifted to the South after 1779. First Savannah then Charleston fell and British forces under Lord Cornwallis began a series of raids into the interior culminating in the Battle of Camden, South Carolina in August, 1780. Patriot forces under the command of General Horatio Gates suffered a disastrous defeat. After that there appeared almost nothing standing in the way of ultimate victory for the British commanders.

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Selma, 1965 III

ead: In 1965 the town of Selma Alabama was the scene of protests and brutal repression. The results: a march to Montgomery and a new Voting Rights Bill.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Martin Luther King, Jr. was convinced that the greatest ally the civil rights movement had lay in the consciences of white people. For too long the white majority had made gestures, had thrown rhetoric in support of liberty and justice, but had acquiesced in the face of bigotry and ideas of white sovereignty. King knew that a frontal assault by blacks on the high wall of institutional prejudice would not succeed. Nonviolent tactics were designed to enflame those white consciences.

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