British Supporters of the American Revolution – II

Lead: During the American Revolution there was substantial and ever increasing opposition to the Crown’s efforts to bring the colonials to heel. Important leaders in that resistance were Wilkes, Rockingham and Burke.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Antagonism to the war effort tended to follow fault lines already present in British politics. On the far left, radical politician John Wilkes had for two decades sought an expansion of the rights of ordinary citizens. A MP from Aylesbury and later Middlesex, in a long career he was on occasion, forced into exile, imprisoned for libel, and condemned by Parliament, but continued to enjoy wide-spread popular support. Elected Lord Mayor of London in 1774, he used that position and membership in Parliament to advocate complete religious toleration and support for the American colonial cause.

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British Supporters of the American Revolution – I

Lead: Most Americans forget that the colonies were seriously divided over the Revolution. As a matter of fact, so was Great Britain.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Some scholars have rightly called the American Revolution the second English Civil War.  While there were large British and Continental armies campaigning up and down the eastern seaboard of North America, the most intense and sometimes brutal conflict during the war years was between partisan groups. Tories and Patriots, operating out in the countryside, burned and pillaged their neighbors’ homes and farms if they were closely identified with or insufficiently supportive of one side or another. Only about half the colonists vigorously backed the cause of independence. The rest were ambivalent about the Revolution or bitterly opposed.

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Mexico: Jesuit Expulsion

Lead: Following the Spanish invasion and conquest, the Roman Catholic Order, the Society of Jesus or Jesuits, were a powerful and sometimes intrusive force for education and evangelism in Mexico.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the mid 1520s, following the Spanish Conquest, Catholic religious orders, Franciscans, Dominicans and Augustinians, began arriving in the Americas as part of a vast missionary movement. Their purpose: the conversion of indigenous peoples to Roman Catholicism. The Spanish Crown justified the Conquest in part by insisting that the occupation of the Americas would expose and convert the native population to Christianity. The Jesuits were among the last to arrive. Their order was not founded by Ignatius Loyola until 1534 nor did the Order receive Papal blessing until 1540.

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Mexico: The Aztecs: Conquered by the Spanish

Lead:  In just two years, the Spanish Conquistadors, led by Hernan Cortez, were able to almost completely destroy the Aztecs, one of the most advanced indigenous empires of the Americas. Beware Spaniards bearing disease.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the late fifteenth century, the Spanish began to occupy the Caribbean, and in 1519, with relatively few resources, invaded present day Mexico and conquered one of the most war-like civilizations in the Americas. In February of that year, Cortez and approximately five hundred soldiers arrived on the Mexican coast. Cortez either burned or scuttled his ships to discourage his already restless company from any thoughts of turning back. They brought with them things Native Americans had never seen before: guns, cannon and between ten and twenty horses. With these weapons and horses, Cortez was able to instill fear in and defeat the indigenous armies.

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