British Supporters of the American Revolution – II

Lead: During the American Revolution there was substantial and ever increasing opposition to the Crown’s efforts to bring the colonials to heel. Important leaders in that resistance were Wilkes, Rockingham and Burke.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Antagonism to the war effort tended to follow fault lines already present in British politics. On the far left, radical politician John Wilkes had for two decades sought an expansion of the rights of ordinary citizens. A MP from Aylesbury and later Middlesex, in a long career he was on occasion, forced into exile, imprisoned for libel, and condemned by Parliament, but continued to enjoy wide-spread popular support. Elected Lord Mayor of London in 1774, he used that position and membership in Parliament to advocate complete religious toleration and support for the American colonial cause.

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British Supporters of the American Revolution – I

Lead: Most Americans forget that the colonies were seriously divided over the Revolution. As a matter of fact, so was Great Britain.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Some scholars have rightly called the American Revolution the second English Civil War.  While there were large British and Continental armies campaigning up and down the eastern seaboard of North America, the most intense and sometimes brutal conflict during the war years was between partisan groups. Tories and Patriots, operating out in the countryside, burned and pillaged their neighbors’ homes and farms if they were closely identified with or insufficiently supportive of one side or another. Only about half the colonists vigorously backed the cause of independence. The rest were ambivalent about the Revolution or bitterly opposed.

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George Washington Carver Part II

Lead: In 1896 agricultural scientist George Washington Carver received a unique invitation. It came from American educator Booker T. Washington.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At this time George Washington Carver had just been appointed to the faculty of Iowa State College – the school’s first African American faculty member. Carver already had a national reputation in the field of agricultural research. Washington asked Carver to come to Alabama to create the agriculture program at Tuskegee Institute. “I cannot offer you money, position or fame. The first two you have… These… I ask you to give up. I offer you in their place: work—hard, hard work, the task of bringing a people from degradation, poverty, and waste…. Your department exits only on paper and your laboratory will have to be in your head.” Carver spent the rest of his life at Tuskegee.

 

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George Washington Carver Part I

Lead: George Washington Carver, a child born into slavery in 1864, would become one of the most renowned and successful of the world’s agricultural scientists.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: George Washington Carver was born to slave parents during the Civil War in Diamond Grove, a small town in southwest Missouri. His birthplace boiled throughout the war in a running conflict between free soil advocates and slaveholders. Carver’s father died accidentally shortly before his birth. Cast adrift and vulnerable, the boy and his mother were kidnapped by slave raiders. Carver was sick with whooping cough and was ransomed by his owners for a horse valued at three hundred dollars. Carver’s mother was never seen again. After emancipation, the orphaned Carver and his brother were taken in by their former owners, Moses and Susan Carver, a kind, childless German couple, who raised them as their own.

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LFM – Walt Whitman

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Though he is perhaps best known as the “Poet of Democracy,” chronicling the lives of working men in whose vocations he apprenticed as a youth and later, Walt Whitman also portrayed the heroic and tragic adventure of war, detailing the crushed dreams, lingering hopes and heartbreak of soldiers, North and South, in the Republic’s greatest epic, the American Civil War.

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LFM: Alfred Thayer Mahan

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose devotion gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Perhaps the greatest naval theorist of the modern period, Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, was afraid of sea duty and avoided it as much as possible, was inclined to sea-sickness, and was inclined to wreck the ships he did command. A brilliant graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he disdained the curriculum there as trivial, made no friends, and served with little distinction on blockade duty during the Civil War. Yet he was undoubtedly an intellect and by the late 1880s he had been posted to the Naval War College where he taught history and established the writing career that made him famous.

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Mexico: Jesuit Expulsion

Lead: Following the Spanish invasion and conquest, the Roman Catholic Order, the Society of Jesus or Jesuits, were a powerful and sometimes intrusive force for education and evangelism in Mexico.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the mid 1520s, following the Spanish Conquest, Catholic religious orders, Franciscans, Dominicans and Augustinians, began arriving in the Americas as part of a vast missionary movement. Their purpose: the conversion of indigenous peoples to Roman Catholicism. The Spanish Crown justified the Conquest in part by insisting that the occupation of the Americas would expose and convert the native population to Christianity. The Jesuits were among the last to arrive. Their order was not founded by Ignatius Loyola until 1534 nor did the Order receive Papal blessing until 1540.

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Mexico: The Aztecs: Conquered by the Spanish

Lead:  In just two years, the Spanish Conquistadors, led by Hernan Cortez, were able to almost completely destroy the Aztecs, one of the most advanced indigenous empires of the Americas. Beware Spaniards bearing disease.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: During the late fifteenth century, the Spanish began to occupy the Caribbean, and in 1519, with relatively few resources, invaded present day Mexico and conquered one of the most war-like civilizations in the Americas. In February of that year, Cortez and approximately five hundred soldiers arrived on the Mexican coast. Cortez either burned or scuttled his ships to discourage his already restless company from any thoughts of turning back. They brought with them things Native Americans had never seen before: guns, cannon and between ten and twenty horses. With these weapons and horses, Cortez was able to instill fear in and defeat the indigenous armies.

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