Ellis Island II

Lead: Of the 12 million immigrants processed through Ellis Island in New York Harbor between 1892-1924, 250,000 were rejected.               

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Many immigrants arriving in New York Harbor were not aware that they would need to pass medical and legal examinations before they were granted permission to enter. The first test came even before the steamship docked. U.S. government doctors would board the ship and check for contagious diseases: smallpox, yellow fever, measles. Infected passengers were removed (taken to hospitals) and the ship was quarantined until it was safe. After docking in Manhattan, ferryboats or barges would transport immigrants to Ellis Island. There they were tested to determine if fit to enter America.

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Ellis Island I

Lead: Between 1892 and 1924, during the peak years of immigration to the United States, twelve million immigrants entered America through Ellis Island.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Ellis Island is a small spit of territory, one mile south of Manhattan in New York Bay. It was named for merchant Samuel Ellis, who for a short time in the 18th century owned the island. On January 1, 1892 it became an inspection station for immigrants coming through the port of New York. Tougher restrictions after 1924, sharply reduced the number of immigrants entering the United States and the immigration center was used for various purposes until it was closed in 1954. Today forty percent (or 100,000,000 Americans) can trace their roots to Ellis Island. On a busy day, as many as three to five thousand immigrants were processed.

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The Black Plague and The Decameron II

Lead: In 1348 the “Black Death” swept through Florence, Italy, and out of this chaos emerged a literary masterpiece – The Decameron.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Italian writer Giovanni Boccaccio witnessed firsthand the devastating effect of the Plague, which killed nearly half the population of Italy. With the collapse of the social and economic order, and some believed a collapse of morality, the Plague stimulated writers to record the event and consider the role of God, man’s free will, and health practices in causing such a magnitude of human suffering.

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The Black Plague and The Decameron

Lead: In the summer of 1348 the “Black Death” swept through prosperous and beautiful Florence, Italy. The tragedy inspired one of the most important medieval literary works, Boccaccio’s The Decameron.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The fourteenth century European Plague or “Black Death” was actually two major bacterial epidemics which resulted in the death of more than 25,000,000 people or just short of a third of the population of Europe. It is believed the Plague originated in the eastern provinces of China and was carried by flea infected rats on board merchant ships sailing from the Black Sea westward to Mediterranean ports. It quickly spread through Western Europe.

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Bonnie and Clyde II

Lead: On May 23, 1934, the law finally caught Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. The long ride and the acclaim came to an end.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: At the time of their deaths, the pair, known popularly as “Bonnie and Clyde,” were a legend in the depression era. Americans were appalled, yet fascinated by the crime spree, the narrow escapes, and the embarrassment the two were causing the law enforcement establishment. For over two years. Bonnie even sent terrible poems and tacky pictures to the press. Many were actually published in national newspapers, thus creating a pair of celebrity outlaws.

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Bonnie and Clyde I

Lead: In 1932, during the Great Depression, Bonnie and Clyde, a team of Texas robbers, captured the public imagination in long bloody crime spree.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, were both born in Texas, in 1909 and 1910, respectively. By the time the couple met in 1930, Clyde Barrow, who grew up in poverty, had already been involved in car thefts and robberies since age fifteen. Bonnie Parker, although a successful student and winner of prizes for writing, had a difficult home life and married at age sixteen. When she met Clyde Barrow in 1930, she was permanently separated from her imprisoned husband.

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Britain Under Siege II

Lead: During the darkest days of the Battle of Britain the ordinary people received encouragement and inspiration from Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Violet May lived in Southhampton England during the worst days of the Blitz. Each night at 6:30 PM the air raid siren would sound. Violet and her  parents and brothers and sisters were expected to leave the house, go out into the back yard and stay six feet down in the air raid shelter until the all clear signal sounded at 6:00 AM the next morning. This was a bother and often the family would ignore the regimen and remain in their own beds.

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Britain Under Siege I

Lead:  On September 3, 1939 Britain found itself at war with Germany for the second time in a quarter century. Because of air power the frontlines of war were no long far from the homefront.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The first air-raid sirens sounded in London twenty-seven minutes after the announcement of war. It turned out to be a false alarm, a French aircraft accidentally wandered into British air space, but it was omen for the future. For the next six years, the home front was the front line. In the twentieth century, no longer would civilians be spared the direct experience of war. Mothers and their sons fought on battlefields of other’s devising.

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