Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley II

Lead: By the 1830s Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley, the wife of Boston Unitarian parson, had become one of the most influential thinkers in America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Self-taught classical scholar, Sarah Ripley, never traveled out of New England and never published any of her writings. Still, she influenced the works and thoughts of many of her contemporaries – Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, William Ellery Channing, and her close friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, her husband’s nephew, and once her pupil.

 

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Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley I

Lead: Born in 1793 in Concord, Massachusetts, Sarah Alden Bradford became one of America’s most influential intellects of 19th century.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley was the eldest child of a New England sea captain with family roots tracing back to the Plymouth Colony governor, William Bradford. She grew up in an intellectual family. Her parents collected books from all over Europe, and they arranged for a classical education for all of their children at a time when there were few opportunities for girls to study classics, much less go to college. Sarah had a precocious mind and a keen sense of observation, particularly of the natural world.

 

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The Parthenon

Lead: Etched on the Athenian skyline, the Parthenon has been subjected to abuse by a succession of regimes, but throughout even in ruin has retained a profound elemental dignity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the formal cessation of hostilities between the city-states of Greece and their Persian antagonist in 449 BC, the citizens of Athens and their formidable leader Pericles returned to pursuits of peace. He wished to make Athens a center of culture and intellect and began with a comprehensive program of construction and refurbishment. Pericles first project was a magnificent new structure that would dominate the Acropolis, the magnificent Temple of Athena Parthenos.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – II

Lead: On May 14, 1607, English colonists made their way ashore sixty miles upriver from the entrance to Chesapeake Bay. On that peninsula, now an island, they built Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Unfortunately, the settlers placed Jamestown in the wrong place. The leaders of the colony, sent out by the London-based Virginia Company, fearing an attack by the Spanish, placed their palisade on a peninsula thinking it would be more easily defended, but from the beginning the settlement was plagued with disease, starvation, dissension and Indian attacks.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – I

Lead: On the evening of December 19, 1606, in London, England, 144 men boarded three ships. Their destination: Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having failed to plant a colony on Roanoke Island on the Outer Banks, with mounting anxiety by 1606 England was determined to gain a grip on the land they claimed in North America. They called it Virginia (in honor of Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen).  Three ships set sail that December, the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. Their voyage was a long one 5000-miles the company commanded by Captain Christopher Newport.

 

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John Steinbeck and The Grapes of Wrath

Lead: In 1939 John Steinbeck published The Grapes of Wrath, perhaps the major American novel of the Great Depression. Its publication, however, was not without controversy.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: John Ernst Steinbeck was born in Salinas, California, a rural community 100 miles south of San Francisco. As a child he observed the hard life of itinerant and migrant farm workers and his boyhood home became the setting of much of his work. Beginning in 1935 with Tortilla Flat, In Dubious Battle, and Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck proved himself an acute observer of social conflict and pain. Yet it was with The Grapes of Wrath that he reached the pinnacle of his literary craft. Much of the material in the novel came from a series of investigative articles the author wrote for the San Francisco News on the plight of the “Oakies,” emigrants from the mid-west dust bowl – Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas. In The Grapes of Wrath Steinbeck wove an elegant, semi-documentary narrative telling the story of the Joads, a 1930s Depression era farm family from Oklahoma. Seeking a better life, they had migrated to California only to find themselves caught in the same cycle of poverty and hopelessness they had left behind. The struggles and hardships of the working poor it seemed are rarely relieved by a change in geography.

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Wilhelm’s Great Fleet – III

Lead: Having set out to build a large battle fleet, in the early 1900s Kaiser Wilhelm II and his German advisors sparked a naval construction race that helped bring the world to war.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the late 1800s the still unchallenged dominant world power was Great Britain. Its empire covered a quarter of the globe, but this empire was a sea empire made possible by the greatest navy the world had known to that time. This navy provided security for international commerce, protected the imperial lifeline to the Far East and shielded the home islands from invasion. When in the 1890s the German Emperor and his ministers set out to build a Navy to rival his British cousins, without realizing it, they threatened the very survival of Britain.

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Wilhelm’s Great Fleet – II

Lead: Already wielding dominant military power in late 19th century continental Europe, German leaders, especially Kaiser Wilhelm II, began to plan for global power projected by a great battle fleet.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1890 the President of the U.S. Naval War College, Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan, published The Influence of Sea Power in History, 1660-1783. In this volume and its sequel he made two arguments. First, he implied that dominant seapower from the Romans to the British made for strategic economic, political and military supremacy. Secondly, he claimed such power only could be achieved with a heavily armed battle fleet. One of Mahan’s most enthusiastic students was the young emperor of Germany, Wilhelm II. His fascination with naval power, especially British naval power, was fired when he spent many youthful summers visiting his grandmother, Queen Victoria, at her summer home, Osborne, on the Solent near the great Portsmouth Naval Base in the south of England. Wilhelm’s began to dream of a German Navy to rival that of his British cousins.

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