Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley II

Lead: By the 1830s Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley, the wife of Boston Unitarian parson, had become one of the most influential thinkers in America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Self-taught classical scholar, Sarah Ripley, never traveled out of New England and never published any of her writings. Still, she influenced the works and thoughts of many of her contemporaries – Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, William Ellery Channing, and her close friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, her husband’s nephew, and once her pupil.

 

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Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley I

Lead: Born in 1793 in Concord, Massachusetts, Sarah Alden Bradford became one of America’s most influential intellects of 19th century.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Sarah Alden Bradford Ripley was the eldest child of a New England sea captain with family roots tracing back to the Plymouth Colony governor, William Bradford. She grew up in an intellectual family. Her parents collected books from all over Europe, and they arranged for a classical education for all of their children at a time when there were few opportunities for girls to study classics, much less go to college. Sarah had a precocious mind and a keen sense of observation, particularly of the natural world.

 

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The Seminole Indians – Part II

Lead: Between 1817 and 1858 the United States government prosecuted three costly wars in Florida against the Seminole Indians. The first of those wars launched the presidential career of Andrew Jackson.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1817 the United States government pursued a policy to aggressively open territory for white homesteaders. As settlers from Georgia moved south into Florida, then Spanish territory occupied by Seminole Indians, hostilities between the Seminoles and settlers provoked first Seminole War (1817-1818). Troops led by General Andrew Jackson defeated the Seminoles, and the clans fled south, deeper into Florida. In 1821 the U.S. acquired Florida from Spain, and fearing a powerful new American government, the Seminoles under treaty surrendered their tribal lands in northern Florida, moved reserved land in central Florida, and accepted in good promises of the U.S. government for protection.

 

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The Seminole Indians – Part I

Lead: In 1817 the dramatic Seminole struggle for survival began. It was the first of three wars the U.S. fought to bring them to heel.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Seminole Indians were not native to Florida. They were a clan of Creek nation who lived in what is Georgia and Alabama. English settlers called them “Creeks” because they inhabited the banks of rivers and streams in the southeastern America. During the early 1700s, in search of fertile ground, to avoid other tribal groups and a desire to escape the conflict with the ever-increasing tide of Europeans some of the Creeks, called the “lower Creeks” (because they lived furthest south), moved into northern Florida, which was then Spanish territory. This group of Creeks, and other Native Americans living in this region, soon became known as the Seminoles, “runaways” perhaps a corruption of the Spanish word Cimarron, meaning “wild” or “runaway.”

 

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The Parthenon

Lead: Etched on the Athenian skyline, the Parthenon has been subjected to abuse by a succession of regimes, but throughout even in ruin has retained a profound elemental dignity.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the formal cessation of hostilities between the city-states of Greece and their Persian antagonist in 449 BC, the citizens of Athens and their formidable leader Pericles returned to pursuits of peace. He wished to make Athens a center of culture and intellect and began with a comprehensive program of construction and refurbishment. Pericles first project was a magnificent new structure that would dominate the Acropolis, the magnificent Temple of Athena Parthenos.

 

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Teflon

Lead: In the history of industrial innovation, often the most profound discoveries come as accidents. Such was certainly the case with Teflon.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the years before they were considered by many to be harmful to the environment, chlorofluorocarbons, (CFCs) often known as Freon, brought a safe, efficient means of refrigeration into commercial and household use. Development of Freons emerged from a joint venture between the Frigidaire division of General Motors and the DuPont Chemical Company. Work with Freons led to the accidental discovery of Teflon. In spring 1938, two DuPont chemists were working with a promising new refrigerant, tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) combined with hydrochloric acid. As a convenience the TFE was stored in pressurized cylinders packed in dry ice. On the morning of April 6th, the chemists discovered that the TFE would not come out. When the cylinders were sawed open the interior walls were lined with a smooth, white, waxy substance. Something in the pressure and low temperature had caused the TFE to polymerize or solidify.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – II

Lead: On May 14, 1607, English colonists made their way ashore sixty miles upriver from the entrance to Chesapeake Bay. On that peninsula, now an island, they built Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Unfortunately, the settlers placed Jamestown in the wrong place. The leaders of the colony, sent out by the London-based Virginia Company, fearing an attack by the Spanish, placed their palisade on a peninsula thinking it would be more easily defended, but from the beginning the settlement was plagued with disease, starvation, dissension and Indian attacks.

 

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The Founding and Early Years of Jamestown – I

Lead: On the evening of December 19, 1606, in London, England, 144 men boarded three ships. Their destination: Virginia.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Having failed to plant a colony on Roanoke Island on the Outer Banks, with mounting anxiety by 1606 England was determined to gain a grip on the land they claimed in North America. They called it Virginia (in honor of Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen).  Three ships set sail that December, the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. Their voyage was a long one 5000-miles the company commanded by Captain Christopher Newport.

 

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