Anthony Ashley Cooper I

Lead: Clever of mind and action and flexible in his alliances in a time of great change in England, Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper served as an early model for the modern politician.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Supple might be a good word to describe the political career of Lord Ashley. He was one of the most interesting and controversial English politicians in the years before and after the Restoration of monarchy in 1660. Born into wealth and prominence on both sides of his family in 1621, he fought for the King in the early days of the English Civil Wars. He then switched sides and served as a local officer of Parliamentary forces in Dorset, served Oliver Cromwell as member of Parliament and on the Commonwealth Council of State, gradually soured on the arbitrary and repressive military politics of Cromwell and the Protectorate, then switched sides again just in time to help make possible the Restoration of King Charles II.

 

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A House Divided: The North on the Eve of War – III Industrial Behemoth

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On the day before Christmas, 1860, the future scourge of Georgia, William Tecumseh Sherman, graduate of West Point and soon to be the late Superintendent of the institution that would become Louisiana State University, was speaking of the looming conflict with his friend and eager secessionist, Professor David French Boyd of Virginia. “The North can make a steam engine, locomotive or railway car; hardly a yard of cloth or pair of shoes can you make. You are rushing into war with one of the most powerful, ingeniously mechanical and determined people on earth, right at your doors. You are bound to fail.” He was supremely correct.

A House Divided: The North on the Eve of War – II: Transportation Revolution

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As the nation approached its greatest conflict, the two regions were unevenly matched in transportation and industrial power. In order to prosecute the war that was looming on the horizon, the North was able to bring men, supplies and the machines of war to the battlefield in a way that was unequalled by its Southern opponents. Historians have called this early nineteenth century phenomenon a transportation revolution. Improved roads, canals and the largest railroad network in the world vastly increased transportation capacity of the nation and reduced the price of transported goods. As the opening of hostilities approached it was clear that the significant balance in transportation strength was in North.

A House Divided: The North on the Eve of War – I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided.”

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: America’s greatest crisis was decided in favor of the proponents of Union because in the end, one side was able to grind the other into submission, physically. It was not immediate, but over time, the enormous population disparity between the North’s and the South’s white majorities sealed the fate of the Confederacy. In 1860 due mostly to immigration and a faster birthrate, the American population had grown much faster than Europe and even the world’s. With thirty-two million inhabitants in its states and territories, the United States was the largest nation in the western world save Russia and France. The Union had a population of over 20,000,000. The white Confederacy had just about 5,000,000, with 4,000,000 slaves either at its disposal or as its burden.

Time Capsule 2002 – Patriots Win Super Bowl, February 3, 2002

Lead: The first Super Bowl after the September 11, 2001 attacks were marked by excellent security and the victory of an underdog.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: As NFL fans gathered in New Orleans in early February 2002 for Super Bowl 36, the minds of spectators and security officials alike were very much on how likely a terrorist target would be the Superdome with nearly 73,000 in attendance. The security was tight and overwhelming. It was called by some, “The Safest Place in the USA.” While the game was absent the usual array of noisemakers, foam fingers and fireworks, security precautions worked smoothly and offered little disruption.

Seven Wonders of the Ancient World: Pyramids at Giza

Lead: Of the seven wonders of the ancient only the three pyramids of Gisa remain as demonstration of the creativity, resourcefulness, and determination of an age far removed from ours.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: They are three in number and probably mark the passing of three Pharaohs, father, son and grandson, of the fourth Egyptian dynasty. The first of the structures was commissioned around 2570 BCE and completed after twenty years of extraordinary effort. The largest is the tomb of Pharaoh Khufu, who died before it was complete, and the smaller possibly by his son and grandson, Khafre and Menkaure.

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A House Divided: Southern Democrats Nominate John Breckinridge

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On April 23, 1860, the Democrats convened in Charleston, South Carolina, but broke up after delegates from the Deep South bolted rather than back Democratic front-runner Stephen Douglas of Illinois. The Party was divided over slavery.  Douglas was an advocate of popular sovereignty and opposed to a federal slave code which would have insured the spread of slavery to the territories and new states.

A House Divided: Democrats Nominate Stephen Douglas

Lead:  One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is A House Divided.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When the Democrats assembled for their party convention in Charleston in April 1860, tensions over the issue of slavery had risen to fever pitch. After the party voted Stephen Douglas’s anti-slavery plank into the platform, just like clockwork, and as expected, fifty delegates from the Deep South walked out in protest. Douglas’ supporters could not round-up the two thirds majority needed for his nomination. Therefore, the convention adjourned on May 3rd and agreed to meet six weeks later in Baltimore, where they hoped to unite the party in an atmosphere more neutral and friendly. This proved to be a forlorn hope. The Democrats were too hopelessly divided to reconcile their differences.