The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – Part II

Lead: Between 1663 and 1729, present day North Carolina and South Carolina were ruled by the Lords Proprietors. They started out with high hopes of wealth and riches but soon discovered the bitter reality of colonization.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: In 1663, English King Charles II paid back eight wealthy political supporters who helped him regain the English throne. Their reward: an enormous land grant in North America. It was Carolina, so named in honor of his father, the late martyred King Charles I. The eight nobles were called Lords Proprietor (ruling landlords). The vast territory contained the present day states of North and South Carolina whose western borders ran all the way to the Mississippi River. The Proprietors hoped to reap rich profits through land rent, farming and the development of commerce in the region. They especially wanted to develop silk plantations, but their dreams of cornering the market of this very expensive commodity came to grief because silk failed in the region.

Read more →

The Carolina Colony and the Lords Proprietors – I

Lead: Before North and South Carolina became royal colonies in 1729, the region was ruled by the Lords Proprietors, a group of British aristocrats who were in the game of colonization to make money. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: During the 1500s both the Spanish and French attempted to colonize the Carolina coast. Their efforts were followed by a failed attempt by the English on Roanoke Island in the 1580s. After the so-called Lost Colony, it was seventy-five years before Europeans attempted another settlement in the Carolinas.

Read more →

Malden Mills and the Ethical Marketplace – II

Lead: The world of business often creates a hostile relationship between worker and employer. One company which seeks to overcome such conflict is Malden Mills of Lawrence, Massachusetts.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: The Fuerstein family has run Malden Mills since the company’s  founding in 1906. The latest CEO is Aaron Fuerstein, born in the decade before the Great Depression. He has guided the company through three major crises, each of which could have caused the company to founder and during each demonstrated an uncharacteristic commitment to the welfare of its employees and the community in which it did business.

Read more →

Leadership: Malden Mills and the Ethical Marketplace – I

Lead: Some say there is little room for moral decision-making in the marketplace.          

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: The triumph of the market as the most efficient means of allocating scarce economic resources is a well-established fact. Despite the fascination of politicians and philosophers with socialism during the twentieth century, that is a system that is rife with waste and in the end fails to economically elevate the very population it seeks to benefit. After all the sound and fury, after all the failed experiments, by the 1990s it was clear that only a free market regimen rewards hard work and risk to a degree that creates a surplus sufficient to improve standards of living. Even governments that are committed to socialism or the command economy, at one level or another, pay homage to the marketplace in hopes of reaping its generous rewards.

Read more →

Leadership: Jo Ann Gibson Robinson

Lead: Some of the most powerful leaders can be those who are almost invisible. Consider the self-effacing and gentle leadership of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson.       

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: It is difficult to remember, at the dawn of the twenty-first century, what it was like to be black in the south just a few decades ago - separate accommodations, separate, but unequal schools, separate public services. One of the singular milestones on the hard road to full-citizenship for African Americans was the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. There, in the mid-1950s, a group of brave, visionary women, led the black community to initial defiance and then stepped aside to let the natural leaders take the lead. They demonstrated the essence of invisible leadership. Scholars Georgia Sorenson and Gill Hickman define invisible leadership as quiet, unobtrusive influence motivated less by self-interest than commitment to a common purpose.

Read more →

Canberra: Capitol of Australia – II

Lead: The site chosen for its new capital chosen, Australia turned to an international competition to choose the designer. The winner was an American of the Prairie School of Architecture, Walter Burley Griffin.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Walter Griffin was considered part of the Prairie School of Architecture, the most prominent proponent of which was Frank Lloyd Wright, who employed Griffin for several years after 1901. Functional, of economic design, and unpretentious, Prairie School Houses were designed to fit into their surroundings. In 1912, Griffin was selected to design the new capitol of Australia southwest of Sydney.

Read more →

Canberra: Capitol of Australia I

Lead: With the coming of the Australian Federation in 1901, the new constitution required the establishment of a capitol. Not Sydney, not Melbourne, but an entirely new seat of government.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Prior to 1900 the continent of Australia was divided between six separate European colonies: New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, Queesland, Western Australia and Southern Australia. In the debates leading to Federation, regional rivalries were so intense, particularly between Sydney and Melbourne, that  the price for agreement was a new capitol, in New South Wales, but at least 100 miles from Sydney.

Read more →

Texas and the Civil War – Part II

Lead: Although there were few military engagements in Texas during the War Between the States, thousands of Texans went east into the fighting and Texas was the scene of the last battle.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Texas joined the Confederacy in March 1861 and supplied the Confederacy with as many as 90,000 soldiers during the four years of conflict. Although several Texas regiments were deployed east of the Mississippi, about two-thirds in the west and the southwest defending Union attempts at invasion, being particularly vigilant on ports and borders, through which supplies flowed to support the Confederate war effort. Troops also warded off Indian and Mexican attacks and  other regiments were sent west to expand the Confederacy into Arizona and New Mexico.

Read more →