Seven Wonders of the Ancient World: Pharos – The Alexandria Lighthouse

Lead: Designed to protect commerce sailing in and out of the port of Alexandria, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, Pharos, the Alexandria lighthouse has proven to be the model for most lighthouses built since.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Almost as if anticipating a modern list of curiosities such as Ripley’s Believe it or Not, The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World was a constantly varying and occasionally updated list of architectural accomplishments maintained by historians such as the Greek scholar Herodotus and Antipater (An-TI-pa-tor) of Sidon. Revisions to the list were made almost into the modern era as structures disappeared or new ones were built. On nearly all the lists was the famous Lighthouse of Alexandria built on the island of Pharos just off the port in about 290 B.C.E.

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The Last Full Measure – Founding of the Coast Guard

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: The United States Coast Guard was founded in 1915, but its roots go far back into American history. Other agencies preceded it or became a part of this consolidation: The Revenue Cutter Service, often called the Revenue-Marine, the Lighthouse Service, the Steamboat Inspection Service, the Bureau of Navigation, and the Lifesaving Service.

Samuel Johnson: The Library in the 18th Century

Lead: It is not surprising that 18th century English writer and critic Samuel Johnson should have an opinion about libraries. He said, “The greatest part of a writer’s time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over a half a library to make one book.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1800 London was the largest city in Europe. With a population of over one million over the previous century it had become the cultural, economic and educational center of an Empire. The explosive growth of manufacturing, trade, and finance had transformed the English middle class. Increasing leisure time meant that the middling sort could enjoy the theater, frequent the City’s hundreds of coffee houses and devote their time to clubs and societies.

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The Last Full Measure – Operation Babylift

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: In the closing days of the Vietnam War, with the North Vietnamese literally at the gates of Saigon, the United States rescued thousands of Vietnamese orphans from harm’s way. Two years after the cease-fire agreement between the US and North Vietnam, the latter began its final assault on the South. In the midst of this chaos, many service organizations began begging the American government to help evacuate thousands of orphans from their facilities in Vietnam. Of particular concern were the offspring fathered by and left behind by American and European soldiers. These Nguoi Lai, or mixed race children, would have been particularly imperiled under the regime of the victorious North Vietnamese.

The Last Full Measure – John Paul Jones

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: In the annals of the United States Navy, no name shines brighter than John Paul Jones. Born in Scotland in 1747, Jones was drawn to the sea and by 1772 was master of his own merchant ship, Betsy. In a crisis of leadership, Jones' crew mutinied and Jones killed a crew member. Sensing that he would be held responsible, Jones fled to the American colonies where, attracted to liberty and the revolutionary cause, he offered his services and skills to the new Republic, receiving one of the first commissions issued by the Continental Navy.

The Road to Philadelphia and Henry Box Brown – II

Lead: In 1848 after Richmond slave Henry Brown saw his wife and children for the last time after they had been "sold South" he decided it was about time he got out of there. He risked his life for a taste of freedom.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: After his family was gone Henry Brown devised a daring and bold plan to escape this system that had so cruelly broken his heart. In 1849 he enlisted the help of a white shoemaker, paid him $84.00, and had himself shipped to Philadelphia. Brown crammed himself, all 5 feet, 8 inches, 200 pounds, into a box three feet long, two feet wide and two feet, eight inches deep and it was nailed shut. The box was labeled “dry goods.” He sat with his knees jammed into his chest and was equipped with a bladder of water, crackers and a sharp tool to poke holes if there was not enough air.

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The Road to Philadelphia and Henry Box Brown – I

Lead: In 1848 the family – wife and children – of Henry Brown was “sold South.”  With little to live for, this industrial slave, risking life and limb, gained fame and freedom in a most unusual way. 

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The pre-war Southern industrial labor system, of which Richmond, Virginia was an integral part, depended on the use of slaves – slaves either owned by or leased for work in factories.  Unlike plantation slaves, these urban slaves often arranged their own lodging, mingled with free blacks, and if they were industrious and hard-working, could do additional work on their time off through the hiring out system.   That was the upside, the downside was “selling South.”  It is estimated that one-third to one-half of the slave families sold at auction in Richmond were split up and sent to other parts of the region.  Tragically, even after the Civil War, many never saw each other again.

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LFM – Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine on Little Round Top

Lead: For 400 years service men and women have fought to carve out and defend freedom and the civilization we know as America. This series on A Moment in Time is devoted to the memory of those warriors, whose sacrifice gave, in the words of Lincoln at Gettysburg, the last full measure.

Content: In early July 1863 the contending forces of Union and Confederate converged on the small Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg. It was Gen. Robert E. Lee's second invasion of the North. He was trying to get between the Army of the Potomac and Washington and bring the war to an end. On July 1st alert Union cavalry units began to gather and blocked his path thus starting the decisive three-day battle that would decide the Civil War.

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