The Blue Riband – Part II

Lead: One of the most interesting developments in the history of transport was the role of government in subsidizing the pursuit of the Blue Riband.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the coming of the global economy in the 1900s speed in ocean transport became one of the vital goals of shippers. No prize was more valued than the Blue Riband, the mythic reward for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic. At first American ships dominated the route between New York and Liverpool, England, but in the 1840s British ships, especially the Cunard steam and sail side-wheelers began to take the lead from the all-sail American packets. The foundation of Cunard's initial success was the mail subsidy. Parliament voted a large cash payment for regular transatlantic service to carry the mail. Ships could then carry cargo and passengers for a lesser fee than if they had to charge actual cost of transport. Speed and regular service were the key to obtaining the government subsidy. The faster the better.

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The Blue Riband – Part I

Lead:  The dream of transatlantic shipping companies was to build a ship able to capture the Blue Riband.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: With the coming of the global economy in the nineteenth century, the element of speed of transport began to acquire more and more importance. The success of a manufacturing plant in Manchester, England depended on how quickly it could get its products to customers in Sacramento, California or Buenos Aires. Because it had no fighting navy to protect its worldwide shipping, and because it was nearly always being caught between one or another of the warring nations of Europe, the United States soon after independence began to take the lead in building very fast light ships that could run blockades and elude captors.

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Baseball and Cuban Independence – Part I

Lead: Considered the national pastime of the United States, baseball was one of the decisive factors in bringing independence to Cuba.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Cuba in the last half of the 1800s was growing restless after centuries of Spanish rule. Several open rebellions had been suppressed by the Madrid government but this only served to intensify the Cuban desire for independence. Tensions between criollos, people born on the island and peninsulares, people from Spain, was growing as the justification for colonialism became less and less appealing for the islanders.

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Kudzu

Lead: It can grow a hundred feet in the summer. It is the subject of poetry and song. It can been seen all over the southland billowing out of fields onto highways, an advancing tide of near unstoppable abundance. Kudzu covers Dixie like the dew.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Kudzu originated in the orient and was brought to the United States by the Japanese as an ornamental plant in their exhibition at the Philadelphia Centennial Celebration in 1876. It was taken south where its thick mat of vegetation provided welcome relief from the summer heat on countless southern porches. About 1900 C.E. Pleas a farmer in Chipley, Florida was discouraged with the poor growth of kudzu near the house, so he pulled it up and threw it on a pile of trash in the backyard. Two years later that dismissed little kudzu plant had covered his trash heap and nearly half the farm. Then his chickens began eating it, and the cows and goats too. Tests showed that Kudzu sent its roots after water seven feet into the soil, aerating it, and because it was a legume, restoring nitrogen in the process.

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The Falkland’s War (1982) – Part IV

                     Lead: Confronting Margaret Thatcher over the Falkland Islands, Argentina's ruling generals failed to consider the Iron Lady's determination or their own strategic advantages.

                      Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                      Content: After years of fruitless negotiation over the small South Atlantic archipelago, Argentina's military government, with substantial popular support at home, invaded the islands on April 2, 1982 and overwhelmed the freshly reinforced contingent of British marines. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher reacted vigorously, threw a 200 mile naval war zone around the islands, and dispatched a task-force to retake them from an Argentine garrison that by the end of April numbered over 10,000 troops. She received United Nations support for a Resolution demanding an immediate Argentine withdrawal.

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Abigail Fillmore

Lead:  Well-read and cultured, Abigail Fillmore maintained a well-tuned political sense in an otherwise lackluster administration.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: When Abigail Power’s preacher father died in 1799, her mother migrated to Cayuga County, then on the New York frontier. Mrs. Powers took responsibility for the education of the children and so well did she did do her job that by the time she was nineteen Abigail was teaching in a country school near Sempronius, New York. In the winter of 1818, she looked up from her desk into the bright, inquiring eyes of a big farm boy who had appeared in her classroom with little notice. The eighteen-year-old was ambitious to become a lawyer and Abigail responded to his enthusiasm. His name was Millard Fillmore and after an eight-year courtship, much of the time spent apart as he was reading for the bar, they began a twenty-seven year marriage.

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The Berlin Airlift – II

Lead: In the summer of 1948 Soviet occupation forces established a full blockade on the City of West Berlin. The allies responded with a giant airlift.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Since the fall of Nazi Germany in 1945, Berlin had been a growing source of bitter contention between the Soviets and their former wartime allies. By 1948, the United States, Britain and France were moving to merge those zones of Germany and Berlin they occupied into a single nation. This posed a threat to Russia and on July 24, 1948 it retaliated with an bold attempt to cut off West Berlin from outside contact and vital supplies of electricity, coal, and food. In a city of 2.5 million there was only food sufficient for 35 days.

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The Berlin Airlift – I

Lead: By July 1948 the Soviet Union no longer was willing to tolerate West Berlin.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: As the end of World War II drew near, the alliance that had hammered Germany into submission began to fall apart. After the war, the Soviet Union forced communist governments on most of those Eastern European nations its army had occupied and erected barriers to impede communications, trade and travel between East and West. Yet, it was Germany that would prove to be the most serious irritant between the two emerging Cold War coalitions. The Soviets occupied the eastern zone while the western zones of Germany were administered by the United States, France and Britain.

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