McKinley Assassination – Part II

Lead:  At the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York Anarchist Leon Czolgosz assassinated the President of the United States William McKinley. He found it was very easy to do it.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Not yet a year into his second term as President, William McKinley was engaged in a running battle with the Secret Service. Less than a year had passed since a plot to kill the President had been uncovered. No matter how hard they argued he refused to allow his guard to be increased or to change his schedule of appearances. One of the most important events of the year was the Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo. It was a celebration of the progress of America with numerous technological exhibits drawing thousands of visitors from around the country. September 5th was Presidents Day with 115,000 paid admissions and a crowd of 50,000 gathered to hear the President in the main plaza. His speech was a general one filled with boilerplate references to the advantages of the American economic and industrial system and a plea for peace among nations.

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McKinley Assassination – Part I

Lead:  On September 4, 1901, Leon Czolgosz (chol-gosh) joined the crowd queuing to shake hands with the President of the United States William McKinley. His right was wrapped as if wounded. The hand contained a gun.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Leon Czolgosz was born in Detroit in 1873. As an adult while employed in a Cleveland, Ohio wire mill he became fascinated with radical politics, particularly anarchism. Anarchists were at base libertarian socialists, they wanted a society based on the voluntary cooperation of free individuals. In general, they were hostile to the leadership class, rejected government and private property. Many anarchists spoke the language of violence and were willing to use it.

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First Ladies: Anna Harrison

Lead: The wife of one President and grandmother of another, Anna Harrison never entered the White House as First Lady.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When she was informed that her husband, William Henry Harrison had been elected President Anna Harrison was not particularly happy. "I wish that my husband's friends had left him where he is, happy and contented in retirement." Sick at the time of the inauguration, she declined the trip preferring to wait for the milder weather of the Washington springtime. Just after the President was sworn in he caught a respiratory infection and died of pneumonia. Until Ronald Reagan, Harrison at 68 was the oldest man to become President and his wife was the oldest First Lady. In many ways her life was similar to Rachel Jackson. Both of them shared their husbands with the nomadic life of the military, both aspired to national political office and both found comfort in their long stretches of loneliness in religious faith as devout Presbyterians.

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The History of the Internet – Part III

Lead: In the 1960s, scientists for the defense department began developing a de-centralized and indestructible data network designed to survive a nuclear war. That was the birth of Internet.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Most U.S. military research and development since World War II has been done by universities and contractors such as the RAND Corporation. They worked on everything from missiles to mashed potatoes. One of the jobs assigned to these contractors was to develop a communications system that would keep commanders in touch with units on the battlefield even after the destruction of a nuclear war. The Defense Department also funded this to help researchers share the few supercomputers around at the time. The network first connected four locations in 1969: UCLA, UC-Santa Barbara, Stanford and Utah. Gradually more and more locations, now called nodes, were brought into the Defense research network. By 1977 scientists had sent from a van traveling on a San Francisco freeway computer data over radio, satellite, and landlines 94,000 miles out and back again instantly.

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The History of the Internet – Part II

Lead: As the tiny signals from Sputnik warned of the Soviet Union's growing scientific and military power in 1950s, defense officials in the U.S. raced to protect their ability to communicate. The Internet was born.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Soviet achievement, with its parallel space race and missile gap, gave the scientific research and development work of the Defense Department an alarming urgency. While colleges increased their math and science requirements, the military services created a department devoted to high-tech experiments, the Advanced Research Projects Agency, or ARPA. It was obvious that to meet the growing Soviet threat, the work of computers had to be made available to units on or close to the battlefield of the future. This was clearly impossible. In the days before the microchip, computers were huge, mainframe devices filled with bulky vacuum tubes and then transistors. Therefore they had to figure a way for portable terminals to communicate with main computers hundreds or thousands of miles away. Existing telephone lines were too unstable. Vital voice or data messages could be interrupted by accident or wartime destruction. The new system had to be virtually indestructible.

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History of the Internet – Part I

Lead: Born of Cold War desperation, the Internet now represents the free-wheeling spirit of the anarchist future.

Intro. A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The excitement generated in the last decade of the twentieth century surrounding the Internet, the world-wide-web of inter-connected businesses, educational institutions, governmental organizations and individuals, who find themselves just one click of the mouse away from each other on has roots that go back to World War II.

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Peter Paul Rubens

Lead: The 16th-century Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens is best known for his vivid joyous murals filled with voluptuous women and fleshy cupids. He was also a hard-nosed businessman and successful diplomat.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Son of an Antwerp lawyer, in 1600 at the age of 22 Rubens went to Italy to complete his training as an artist. A chance meeting brought him into the service of the Duke of Mantua who used him not only as a painter but also as an advisor and informal representative. Rubens used his time in Italy well, studying the work of Italian painters and absorbing the decayed culture of Italy's classical past. He returned to Antwerp in 1608 and was hired as court painter to the Hapsburg Archduke Albert of the Spanish Netherlands.

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The Blue Riband – Part III

Lead: Having lost the competition to build the fastest ships on the transatlantic route, the United States regained the lead only to witness the end of the regular ocean passenger service.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the mid-1800s the major maritime powers, Britain and the United States, were locked in a fierce competition to provide regular and fast shipping service on the Atlantic routes for passengers, mail, and cargo. As the contest intensified the swiftest ship could claim the Blue Riband, the mythic reward for the fast Atlantic crossing. British shippers led by Samuel Cunard's sail and steam side-wheelers took the lead from the Americans because of generous subsidies from Parliament and because they were quicker to take advantage of innovations in ocean transport. Soon the Brits were launching all steam ships with iron hulls, swamping their American rivals. By the 1860s, distracted by a decade of Civil War and recovery and reluctant to spend tax-payers money subsidizing the Atlantic Ferry, the United States largely dropped out of the transatlantic routes and the race for the Blue Riband. The prize was mostly traded back and forth by several British lines.

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