Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign – III

Lead: In less than sixty amazing days in the wet spring of 1862, the foot cavalry of General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson transformed the strategy of both North and South in the Civil War.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: After an initial tactical defeat at Kernstown in March, Jackson re-organized his forces and relieved his best subordinate General Garnett for retreating unbidden when his brigade had been out-flanked and out of ammunition at Kernstown. This sent a chilling warning through the ranks. Retreat for Stonewall was a tactic to be employed as a prelude to attack. There would be no unauthorized retreat. Jackson also convinced Richmond that he could use re-enforcements and they sent General Richard Ewell’s division. In late April, Jackson began to demonstrate his two rules of engagement: Firstly, mystify, mislead and surprise the enemy, and Secondly, find only part, preferably the weakest part of your enemy, and crush it.

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Young Man Hitler – II

Lead: Product of a domineering father and indulgent Mother, head-strong young Austrian Adolf Heilder entered school with an unusual gift for speaking and a desire to become an artist.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Neither by his Mother’s permissiveness or Father’s uncontrolled anger was young Adolf given a structured environment in his home and he became a self-willed and stubborn child. He early on became fascinated with German history, particularly the glory days of the Franco-Prussian War in 1870-1871, and as a borderland resident adopted the Pan-German inclination to admire the German Kaiser.

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Young Man Hitler – I

Lead: Six decades after he took his own life amid the rubble of the Third Empire, Adolf Hitler continues to hold the imagination of the world as it looks for clues in his childhood to the development of a monster.

 

                Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Since he burst on the scene in a failed coup attempt in a Munich Beer Garden in 1923, Adolf Hitler seemed to understand Germany and the needs of his adopted home. His substantial rhetorical ability allowed him to speak for many Germans who were disappointed at the national defeat in 1918, sensed that Germany was being denied her appropriate place in the ranks of great nations, and longed to be challenged to national distinction. He took German to its moment of greatest triumph and down to terrible defeat. Many of the impulses that animated this tragically brilliant man can be traced to his childhood in Austria in the years before the turn of the 20th century.

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Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign – II

Lead: His name evoked witchery and profound admiration, but Thomas J. “Stonewall,” Jackson largely remains an enigma to students of his brilliant Valley Campaign of 1862.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Stonewall Jackson has been called everything from a military genius to a blue-eyed assassin. His students at the Virginia Military Academy called him Tom Fool behind his back, but later came to regard him with near worship after his talent for strategy and leadership in desperate circumstances, help turn the tide for the South in the early months of the Civil War. He was an orphan who grew up in near poverty, passed from one set of relatives to the other. A chance opportunity landed him ill-prepared in the ranks of the United States Military Academy at West Point, but through sheer academic sweat he elevated his graduating class standing to number 17.

 

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Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign – I

Lead: In the annals of the Civil War no name is more renown than Stonewall. T. J. Jackson earned his reputation as a supreme strategist in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862.

 

                Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Despite early victories, the prospects for the Confederacy in the Spring of 1862 were exceedingly bleak. New Orleans was in Federal hands as was most of Tennessee. General George McClellan had landed on the Virginia Peninsula and was pressing Richmond. Union troops in large numbers were moving south down the Shenandoah Valley to remove that breadbasket from rebel hands and come at Richmond from the west. All that stood in their way were 3500 troops thrown together by Major General Thomas Jonathan Jackson, an austere, rather eccentric former professor at the Virginia Military Academy, whose firmness in the face of Union assault at the First Battle of Manassas in June 1861 had earned him the nickname Stonewall.

 

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Spanish Armada – III

Lead: Clearly provoked by English policy, in 1588 Philip II of Spain sent a large fleet to support an invasion of southern England. It turned out not to be much of an Armada and was certainly not invincible.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: By 1585 Philip was convinced that in order to break English economic, diplomatic and military power and to restore Catholicism to England, he would need to mount an invasion. As it evolved, here was the plan. The Spanish would assemble a fleet of warships filled with supplies and troops, sail to Flanders in what is modern day Belgium, secure the Straits of Dover from English naval interference, screen the transport across the English Channel of 30,000 troops under the command of the Duke of Parma, vice-regent of the Spanish Netherlands, and support the invasion. From the beginning, almost everything went wrong.

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Spanish Armada – II

Lead: In 1588 Spain sent a powerful fleet to support an invasion of southern England. Despite English propaganda to the contrary, this action was clearly provoked by the government of English Queen Elizabeth I.

 

                Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: In the early days of her rule, one of Elizabeth’s best friends was King Philip II of Spain. He had been the husband of her sister and predecessor, Mary Tudor. He hoped that Elizabeth would continue Mary’s policy of Catholic restoration and, perhaps, even accept his hand in a powerful dynastic and diplomatic marriage. By 1560, however, it was clear Elizabeth desired a modified Protestantism for England and that she was toying with Philip’s affections just as she would every man who sought, by winning her heart, to compromise her power and capture her kingdom.

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Spanish Armada – I

Lead: By the mid-1580s Philip II of Spain had had enough. He determined to destroy his heretical sister-in-law Elizabeth and bring her backward, troublesome little island kingdom to heel.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Philip of Spain always had high hopes for Elizabeth. He had, after all, been her brother-in-law, married to Mary Tudor, her older sister. Mary’s rule was short, however, and the queen died before she and Philip could produce the Catholic heir that might, over time, have restored stubborn England to the true faith. Philip didn’t like the English and they returned the compliment. Nevertheless, he hoped that when Mary died and Elizabeth took her place in 1558, he might win her hand and continue to pull England back out of Protestantism. A marriage would also maintain the European balance of power thus keeping France at a diplomatic disadvantage. Unfortunately, Elizabeth understood that marriage to Philip would drag England into continental disputes on the side of Spain, but more importantly, insure her power as a female ruler would be compromised in a marriage. Therefore, she paried Philip’s advances as she did the long line of suitors that tried to ensnare her heart and her throne.

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