Nancy Randolph – II

Lead: In spring 1793, a sensational trial packed the Cumberland County courthouse. The accused were first family Virginians – Randolphs – Nancy and her brother-in-law Richard. They were accused of adultery and murder.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Richard and Nancy Randoph were first cousins, descendants of the same family of wealthy Virginia tobacco planters. Nancy lost her mother as a young girl and settled with her older sister Judith and Judith’s husband Richard at “Bizarre,” one of the Randolph family plantations on the Appomattox River near Farmville.

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Nancy Randolph – I

Lead: In 1790s Virginia was scandalized by the sensational trial following a story of alleged adultery, murder, and deception involving one of the oldest aristocratic families in the Commonwealth. 

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Beginning in the 1650s, a group of planters, emigrants from England began to dominate the Virginia tidewater. Among the earliest of the Virginia gentry were the Byrds, Beverleys, Carters, Masons and Randolphs. These protestant, so-called first families of Virginia, obtained huge tracts of land on navigable rivers in the Chesapeake region. They built plantations and successfully cultivated tobacco for a growing world market. Many of the same planter families continued to exercise social and political power well into the twentieth century, but their dominance was not universal, particularly as the fulcrum of power shifted to Richmond and as the back-country filled up with those no longer beholden to these clans and their allies and resentful of first family status.

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Spanish Civil War (Francisco Franco) – III

Lead: Both during and after the Spanish Civil War, Francisco Franco led the nationalists. He and his allies were determined to halt Spain’s drift into the modern world, but they failed.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: In July, 1936 conservative generals led by Francisco Franco attempted a coup d’etat against the elected government of Spain’s Second Republic. Their goal was a quick and bloodless take-over using rebellious army units. To their surprise the government did not roll over, but stood firm. The Spanish Civil War lasted for three years, produced horrendous casualties, and created tension divides Spanish society to this day.

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Spanish Civil War (Francisco Franco) – II

Lead: The driving force behind the nationalists in the Spanish Civil War was General Francisco Franco Bahamonde. He lived in the world of the past and devoted his life to keeping Spain there as well.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Franco was born in 1892. Spain at the time was conservative, Catholic, and nursed a waning, but powerful imperial memory. No longer the center of the world and soon to have Cuba and the Philippines, its two remaining colonial jewels, taken in the Spanish-American War, Spain needed to move quickly to exploit its rich natural, political and human resources, but it did not. That Spain would be denied its rightful place in the ranks of modern, democratic, and progressive societies until the 1970s, was in good measure the result of the life work of Francisco Franco.

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Bozeman Trail

Lead:  Perceived as a short cut to Montana gold and Oregon settlement, the Bozeman trail cut almost three months off the journey, but there was one major problem.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: The premier immigrant trail running through the upper Midwest to Washington and Oregon was the Oregon Trail or Overland Trail. Traced in the 1830s and heavily traveled through the 1850s it provided a rough and dangerous alternative to sea travel It went up the North Platte River through South Pass, the Snake River Valley and the Blue Mountains and into the Willamette Valley. Yet the Oregon Trail was by no means an easy route and during the Civil War, with the discovery of gold in western Montana, word began to circulate of a new trail, a short cut, with better water for the stock and better grades that could eliminate time and distance in the journey west. The problem was it cut across territory jealously guarded by a normally fractious and loose federation of clans Lacota, Cheyenne and Arapaho. Their repeated attacks on miners and wagon trains gave the Trail its nickname, “Bloody Bozeman.”

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Joseph Glidden and the Invention of Barbed Wire

Lead: In the settlement of the western United States no problem was more vexing than how to organize the wide-open spaces. The prickly solution came from a Illinois farmer, Joseph Farwell Glidden.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: In the fall of 1873 at the county fair near De Kalb, Illinois. A local farmer, Henry Rose, demonstrated a new way of dealing with an unruly cow. He had randomly driven spikes through a wooden board and hung it on the pasture fence. When the cow tried to break through the fence, she got stuck by the spikes and didn’t try that again. Watching this were three men, lumberman Jacob Haish, a German immigrant, local hardware dealer, Isaac Leonard Ellwood, and another farmer, Joe Glidden. There is no evidence that they communicated at the fair, but the exhibit set their inventive juices boiling and each began to experiment on ways of improving Rose’s idea.

 

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