Fulton’s Folly – Part II

Lead: On August 17, 1807, Robert Fulton, in a thirty-two-hour experimental excursion, ushered in of a new era of transportation. Steam power took to water.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Fulton, artist, inventor and engineer, directed the construction of a steamboat he had conceived while previously living in Paris, working there on canal and submarine designs. It was in the French capital that Fulton met the American minister to Napoleon’s government, Robert Livingston a wealthy and aristocratic New York businessman. Livingston contracted with Fulton to design a commercial steamboat for use on the Hudson River. Although his was not the first steamboat, Fulton demonstrated conclusively this means of propulsion was a much needed and practical form of transportation.

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Fulton’s Folly – Part I

Lead: On August 17, 1807, from the shoreline of the Hudson River, spectators witnessed a shocking sight. There in the river was a mechanical monster spewing flames and smoke. It was Mr. Fulton’s Folly.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Robert Fulton’s first steamboat ushered in a new era of transportation and industrialization. The North River Steamboat of Clermont, later simply referred to as Clermont, was named after the early Dutch name for the Hudson River. Clermont was the hometown of Fulton’s partner and financier, Robert Livingston, prominent New York lawyer, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and former minister to France.

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Luncheon Racism – Part I

Lead: In early February 1960, the Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, became a powerful symbol the in the fight against racial segregation in the American south.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Late in the afternoon on February 1st, four students from North Carolina Agriculture and Technical College – Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil, Ezell Blair and David Richmond - staged a “sit in.” Three of the four were freshmen, all still teenagers, were respectfully dressed in coats and ties, and one, ROTC student Franklin McCain, was still in uniform. Carrying their schoolbooks, the students entered the Woolworth’s on South Elm Street and purchased a few school supplies, and then proceeded to the “whites only” lunch counter where they sat down and politely asked for service which as they anticipated, was denied. One of the students later told the UPI, “We believe, since we buy books and papers in the other part of the store, we should get served in this part.”

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Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia – II

Lead: In June 1863, West Virginia, having seceded from Confederate Virginia, became the thirty-fifth state in the Federal Union of the United States of America.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: By the onset of the Civil War, major tension had developed between the eastern region of Virginia (east of the Alleghenies) and the west counties on the other side of the mountains. As sectionalism between the north and the south led to war, sectionalism in Virginia reached a crescendo. In the Commonwealth, before the Civil War, political and economic power lay in the east in the tidewater and piedmont regions where wealthy landowners had grown dependent on slave labor to work their plantations. In contrast, western Virginia was a land of frontiersmen and immigrants who cleared their own land and worked small farms.

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Western Virginia Secedes from Virginia- I

Lead: In 1863, during the Civil War, the western counties of Confederate Virginia, after decades of dissatisfaction, seceded from the Commonwealth to form a new state as part of the Federal Union.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Following the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, eleven states, including Virginia, seceded from the Union. Most of the Virginia population west of the Appalachians opposed secession. Wealthy plantation owners, dependent on slave labor, dominated the eastern tidewater region and southside Virginia. The western part of the state, the trans-Allegheny region, was populated by frontiersmen and late-arriving immigrants from Scotland, Germany, Ireland and Wales. They raised their own livestock and farmed land they had cleared with their own hands. Comparatively few slaves or slaveholders could be found in the west.

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Food and Drug Administration

Lead: One important agent in America’s defense against contaminated food, ineffective or dangerous drugs or fraudulent product claims is the Food and Drug Administration.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: Until the 20th century, most people in the United States grew up on farms or in the small towns of rural America. Most of the food or medical remedies there consumed were prepared and concocted at home or bought close to home. If you did not make your own, you usually knew the person who did make it. Food was raised or cured fresh and either eaten on the spot, canned for the basement, or stored in the smokehouse. Home remedies were fashioned from herbs and roots from adjacent fields. Neighborliness, community discipline and face-to-face bargaining usually prevented outright fraud.

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James Oglethorpe and the Founding of Georgia – II

Lead: James Edward Oglethorpe marshaled the arguments and the parliamentary support for the establishment of a new colony south of Carolina. He is considered the Founder of Georgia.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: Like his father and brother before him, beginning in 1722 James Oglethorpe sat in Parliament. Early in his career at Westminster, spurred by the tragic death of a friend thrown into prison because of debt, he chaired a committee investigating prison conditions. He found them to be appalling. Should a debtor by some chance survive the corruption, disease, and brutality of a prison term, he would have little chance of returning to a productive life once released. At the same time concern was growing in the government about the threat posed by hostile Indian clans and the possibility of Spanish encroachment against the exposed southern flank of the immensely valuable colony of Carolina.

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James Oglethorpe and the Founding of Georgia – I

Lead: The founding of the North American English colony of Georgia emerged from the happy confluence of political shrewdness and personal dedication in the life of James Edward Oglethorpe.

 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

 

                Content: What would become the Royal colony of Georgia got its start because of social problems in the mother country and a serious military threat to Britain’s interests in North America. The mid-wife to the colony’s birth was James Oglethorpe. One of the interesting features of liability law in England during the 1700s was the power of a creditor over a debtor. A creditor was permitted by law to take possession of the debtor’s body. If you owed a debt and could not pay it, your creditor could throw you in jail until you paid. Not surprisingly, prisons were filled with people whose only crime was that they had fallen on hard times and could not pay their bills. Studies of prison conditions at the time revealed pitiful stories of corrupt judges and prison officials, bribery, extortion, brutality, and disease. If they survived and were released, these so-called debtor criminals had little hope of a decent or productive life.

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