Abigail Adams

Lead:  Abigail Adams was the first and only woman to be both First Lady and mother of a President of the United States.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The marriage of John and Abigail Adams is one of the great love stories in American History. Their abundant correspondence exchanged during John Adams' frequent absences on commonwealth or national business, reveals a mutual respect, admiration, and are surprisingly passionate considering his often sour disposition and rather grim reputation as a determined and dedicated patriot.

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Frank Turner – Architect of the Interstate

Lead:  Frank Turner shaped the largest public-works project in U.S. history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Francis Turner grew up in Texas farm country during the Great Depression. At that time a person could work off their poll tax by doing a day's work building or repairing farm-to-market roads and he remembered helping his father on those roads. He studied soil science at Texas A & M University and worked on military roads in Alaska during the war. After World War II he went to help re-construct the highway system in the Philippines.

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William Cullen Bryant and the Politics of Fresh Air

Lead:  Poet and editor William Cullen Bryant was one of the first to advocate the importance of recreational parks in urban America.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When Bryant migrated to New York from rural Massachusetts in 1825, he was already one of the nation's most prominent men of letters having penned as a teenager his most famous work, "Thanatopsis," which some consider the first great American poem.

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Theodore Roosevelt and World War I – Part II

Lead:  In the Spring of 1917, the United States declared war on Germany.  In the wake of this decision, former President Theodore Roosevelt volunteered to lead a division of volunteers to fight in the trenches of Europe.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson did not like each other. The President and the man whose independent bid for a third term in the White House probably secured the election for Wilson in 1912, circled warily around each other on the political landscape. There was little respect between the two. Roosevelt saw Wilson as without "a spark of manhood," and as being a base demagogue, an utterer of "weasel words," a hero to "flubdubs and the mollycoddles." Wilson believed that Roosevelt viewed the war as a playground for his egotism. He told a colleague that his predecessor was unscrupulous and his words were outrageous in every particular.

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Theodore Roosevelt and World War I – Part I

Lead:  As the war clouds gathered in Europe, an old Rough Rider campaigned to lead a volunteer force to fight in the trenches.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Theodore Roosevelt was a man given to the flamboyant act, the political flourish. With convictions firmly held and vigorously argued, the twenty-sixth President of the United States, rarely shrank from a chance to express his opinions and did so with a flair that won him much acclaim but also numerous political enemies.

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Architect of Victory – Admiral Earnest King

Lead:  During World War II, the organizer of the U.S. Navy's contribution to victory was a determined, often grumpy and taciturn Scot, born November 23, 1878, Fleet Admiral Ernest Joseph King.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Raised by his father, a hard working railroad foreman of Scottish heritage, King secured an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy and was commissioned in 1903.

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Baruch Spinoza

Lead: One of the most creative thinkers of the seventeenth century was an Amsterdam lens maker, Baruch Spinoza born on November 24, 1632.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Spinoza's father and grandfather were Portuguese. The regime of the Spanish Inquisition forced them to convert to Christianity even though privately they retained their Jewish faith. The Union of Utrecht in 1579 decreed that in Holland there would be religious freedom and the Spinoza clan migrated to Amsterdam, becoming there prosperous merchants and respected members of the Jewish community.

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The Sexual Politics of Elizabeth I – III

Lead: Elizabeth I, Queen of England, used her sexuality for the good of the nation.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content:  In one of her first speeches to Parliament Elizabeth gave a strong signal as to how she viewed her role as a monarch and as a woman. She said, "I have already joined myself to a husband, namely the Kingdom of England." From that point on, the Queen's use of her sexuality, was subtle and manipulative, but also ultimately very useful in helping bring stability and prosperity to England.

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