Treaty of Tordesillas, 1494 – III

Lead: In early summer 1494 Portugal and Spain, the two leading maritime powers of Europe, perhaps of the world, met in the southwestern village Tordesillas to carve up the world.

               Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Spain had come late to the exploring enterprise, but when Columbus actually found something on his voyage to what became known as the New World, his patrons, Spanish rulers Ferdinand and Isabella, were quick to recognize their peril.  Portugal was lurking just over the horizon ready to take advantage of any territorial claims that Spain was not able to secure by force of arms or diplomacy.

Read more →

Treaty of Tordesillas, 1494 – II

Lead: Hearing that Columbus had returned from the expedition to the New World they had sponsored, the rulers of Spain attempted to secure their interests by turning to a higher power.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: When Columbus in 1493 first returned to the Old World from his first voyage to the New World, he first landed on the coast of Portugal. He was immediately invited to Lisbon to describe his findings. Portuguese King John II, quickly  laid claim to all of Columbus's findings. He did so on the basis of the previous treaty, sanctioned by the pope of the Roman Catholic Church Sixtus IV in 1481.

Read more →

Treaty of Tordesillas, 1494 – I

Lead: In 1493, shortly after the return of Christopher Columbus, Spain's rulers petitioned the pope to protect their interests.  The far-reaching result was the Treaty of Tordesillas.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Spice. For centuries, spices - white and black pepper, cinnamon cloves, mace, frankincense, nutmeg, cassia, myrrh – from China, India, and the southeastern Asia island archipelago, have commanded fortunes and shaped empires. Spices were used to preserve foodstuffs. Aromatic spices were also the basis for exotic medical and therapeutic elixirs and syrups.

Read more →

Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders – II

Lead: Theodore Roosevelt's leadership of the Rough Riders in Cuba during the Spanish-American War was the fulfillment of the dreams of a man craving action and the defining moment of his political career.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: The Rough Riders were an unlikely collection of cowboys, Indians, roughnecks, and eastern aristocrats recruited by Roosevelt himself. In early May 1898 they assembled in San Antonio and begin their training. The great man arrived on May 15 and while some of the men were skeptical at first they soon changed their minds. One remembered him, "he is nervous, energetic, virile.  He may wear out someday, but he will never rust out."

Read more →

Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders- I

Lead: Overcoming physical weakness Theodore Roosevelt became a highly effective reform politician, intellectually acute historian, and instinctive amateur military leader of the Rough Riders in the Spanish-American War.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Born to privilege in New City before the Civil War, Theodore Roosevelt, who would become the 26th President of the United States, grew up a physically weak, asthmatic child, with weak eyesight.  Through sheer force of will and determination became physically vigorous and intellectually acute young man.

Read more →

Nancy Langhorne Astor – II

Lead: After a trophy marriage to a wealthy British aristocrat, Nancy Langhorne Astor of Danville Virginia, first woman in parliament,  became one of the most famous women in the world.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: after being a lack did to the British Parliament in 1910, Waldorf Astor became a rising political star.  His career came abruptly to an end in October 1919 when his father died and he succeeded to the elder Astor's noble title. After he resigned from the House of Commons to take a seat in the Lords, Waldorf began to promote his wife as a substitute.

Read more →

Nancy Langhorne Astor – I

Lead: born the third daughter of eight surviving children, Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor, one of the world's most famous women, prevailed as a girl, through the use of a rapier wit and prodigious energy.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: By the time Nancy was born in 1879, Chiswell Dabney Langhorne had recovered his fortune. He had been a wealthy farmer before the Civil War but struggled financially in the little southside Virginia tobacco town of Danville.

Read more →

John Knox II

Lead: In the mind of John Knox, the circumstances of persecution in England and the teachings of the Hebrew scriptures on the covenant swirled into the concept of righteous revolution.

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: The life of John Knox hovered over the fault line between religion and politics.  Europe was aflame. Catholics and Protestants persecuted and were persecuted for their faith. Knox struggled to describe the appropriate Christian attitude toward leaders who were idolatrous and disobedient to God.

Read more →