Narcis Monturiol – Catalan Inventor

Lead: A curious combination of entrepreneurial creativity and philosophical socialism, Narcis Monturiol developed and built the first successful submarine in 1859. 

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Narcis Monturiol Estorial was born in the Catalan fishing village of Figuras 1819 on the coast of northeastern Spain. He completed his law degree in Barcelona at the age of 24 and like many European intellectuals of the 19th century was early on infected with a lifelong attachment is socialist. He became editor of the progressive activist publications and for a time was tempted to become a part of a pacifist brotherhood, the Icarians, who were attempting to settle a socialist utopian community in America.

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Madness of King George III – II

Lead: during the last quarter century of his life King George III of Great Britain suffered terrifying episodes of mental illness.  Thought to be manic depression his disease may have been something else entirely.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Beginning in the fall of 1788 and returning three more times 1801, 1804 and 1810, stress and illness would widen into mentally erratic behavior.  The king had suffered from depression at times during his reign but this was different.

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Madness of King George III – I

Lead: In the years following the American Revolution King George III of Great Britain began to experience mental collapse. His disease brought sorrow and confusion to his family and the nation.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content:  During his 60 years as Monarch of Great Britain George William Frederick presided over the acquisition of a great empire, the loss of his American colonies, the defeat of revolutionary and Napoleonic France and the emergence of Britain is one of the leading powers of Europe.  Yet, during the last quarter century of his life, suffered from a recurrent and debilitating mental illness.      

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Jamestown Journey: John Rolfe – II

Lead: In 1616 Mr. and Mrs. John Rolfe and their infant son Thomas, sailed for England. There John and Pocahontas took the country by storm, impressing investors and emigrants with the opportunities to be had in Virginia.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Through his experimenting with the sweet Caribbean variety of tobacco, John Rolfe had discovered the key to Virginia's economic salvation. His marriage to Pocahontas had secured a welcome respite in tension between Native Americans and the settlers. Two years after their marriage he brought his family with Governor Sir Thomas Dale to England to encourage financial support for the colony and recruitment for settlers.

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Black Panther Party – II

Lead: In the 1960s the Black Panther party represented a far more aggressive posture among African Americans frustrated continued resistance to full participation by blacks in the benefits of American freedom.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: Formed in 1966 by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, joined in leadership by Eldridge Cleaver and Stokely Carmichael, the Panthers combined ideas of black separatism influenced by Malcom X and an economic critique of western capitalism straight out of Karl Marx. This mix joined with a rhetoric of violence and confrontational tactics with authority, evoked fear and reaction in both white and black communities. 

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Black Panther Party – I

Lead: After generations of second-class citizenship, African-Americans made significant progress toward equality in the 1950s and 60s.  For many this was not enough. Some of them formed the Black Panther Party.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts. 

                Content: Perhaps the most important contribution of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the progress of black rights in America was his instinctive commitment to nonviolence protest. While he was an excellent strategist and a powerful public speaker, he and his associates knew that white America could persuaded to back their goals if violence was inflicted on blacks demanding their rights and blacks responded with moderation.

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The Battle of Crécy – II

Lead: In August 1346, their backs to the River Somme, the rough, hearty, and quite outnumbered peasants of Edward III inflicted a devastating defeat on the cream of French knighthood near the village of Crécy.

                Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

                Content: It was supposed to be another summer of cavalry raids and booty taking for the archers and

footmen of King Edward III. For the first 10 years of the Hundred Years’ War years this pattern had been the same: cross the channel, steal rape and pillage, and then off for home, but this summer the French were ready and brought the English army to heel near the village of Crécy near the Somme River.

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The Battle of Crécy – I

Lead: Three great battles framed the Hundred Years’ War.  Crécy, Poitiers,  and Agincourt. For most of the rest of the time, the war was a series of lightening cavalry raids and cross-channel forays painful but not really decisive. Not in 1346 and not at Crécy.  

            Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

            Content: When King Philip VI of France expropriated the vast territories of English King Edward III in France in the 1330s, the Frenchman provoked what has come to be known as the Hundred Years’ War. Even though he had a powerful claim to the French throne himself, Edward was content to forgo those claims and swear allegiance to Philip as his liege Lord. After all, even though Edward was King of England, he still owned, by right of inheritance, Aquitaine, a huge swath of territory in southwestern France. When Philip grabbed his land, Edward reached out for Aquitaine by asserting his own claim to be King of France.

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