Emancipation of Brazil’s Slaves

Lead: The abolition of slavery in Brazil was due in large part to the influence of two courageous but pragmatic rulers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brazil was one of the few Latin American countries to gain peacefully its independence from European rule. During Napoleon's invasion of Portugal in the early 1900s, its rulers fled to their South American colony. When the French were no longer a threat, the Portuguese monarchs left Prince Pedro in charge. In 1822 he declared the independence of the nation and himself Emperor of Brazil. The stability provided by the monarchy was largely unmatched in the region.

The Day the Incas Died II

Lead: Aided by internal divisions among the Incas, Francisco Pizarro hauled a small band of adventurers and a few cannon over the coastal sierras into a three-mile high valley deep in the Andes in the fall of 1532. He was there seeking gold, most especially that which was controlled by the Incan ruler, Atahaulpa.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

After an initial contact which demonstrated how easily the Incans could be terrified, Pizarro readied his men by hiding them out of sight in the buildings that surrounded square of the royal retreat at Cajamarca. Atahaulpa interpreted this as fear on the part of the Spaniards ignoring the possibility of ambush. Late in the afternoon the emperor came into the city accompanied by thousands of his followers. The king's litter was placed in the center of the square and a lone Spaniard came forward to greet the King of the Incas. 

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The Day the Incas Died I

Lead: Francisco Pizarro had been nibbling around the edges of the west of coast of South America for years.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Rumors of vast stocks of gold and silver owned by native tribes living in the mountain passes of the Andes in what is now Peru pulled Pizzaro and a small band of adventurers on a series of ever-southward voyages from 1524 until the fall of 1532. 

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Guano

Lead: As world population grew in the years before and after 1800 so did the demand for food. At the same time, much farm acreage was depleted, tired, unproductive. This problem was solved in part with guano.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Guano is bird excrement. Grouped with the droppings of bats and seals it is perhaps the most potent natural fertilizer, and bird guano is the primo variety containing up to 16% nitrogen, 12% phosphorus, and 3% potassium. In the mid 19th century, guano was treated as if it were gold, provoked at least one fighting war, and made enormous fortunes for growers and suppliers alike.

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Emancipation of Brazil’s Slaves

Lead: The abolition of slavery in Brazil was due in large part to the influence of two courageous but pragmatic rulers.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Brazil was one of the few Latin American countries to gain peacefully its independence from European rule. During Napoleon's invasion of Portugal in the early 1900s, its rulers fled to their South American colony. When the French were no longer a threat, the Portuguese monarchs left Prince Pedro in charge. In 1822 he declared the independence of the nation and himself Emperor of Brazil. The stability provided by the monarchy was largely unmatched in the region.