Lexington, Massachusetts, 1775 II

 

Lead: Having killed Minutemen on the Lexington, Massachusetts green in April, 1775, British regulars moved off to Concord.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The British soldiers were sent by Governor Gage to capture provincial arms and the leaders of the Massachusetts rebellion, John Hancock and Sam Adams. In the end they got neither, but like a man sticking his hand into a hornets’ nest they stirred up a Revolution.

Lexington, Massachusetts, 1775 I

 

Lead: A brief skirmish between British Regulars and colonial militia in Lexington, Massachusetts in April 1775 set off a revolution.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Thomas Gage, the Royal Governor of Massachusetts in the spring of 1775, liked Americans, but it seemed as though the sentiment was not mutual, at least among a certain number of his colonial charges. Led by Samuel Adams and John Hancock, some of the provincials were in thinly disguised rebellion. They had tossed together a Provincial Congress and had begun to assemble war materiel in the tiny village of Concord westward, 21 miles up the Boston Neck. Gage, under pressure from London, had his eyes on those arms and the colonial leaders, to seize the weapons and arrest Hancock and Adams.

American Revolution: March to Massacre II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: In late February 1770, the situation in Boston reached critical mass. The poisonous relationship between British soldiers and the townspeople was amplified by the death of 11-year old Christopher Seider, killed by a supporter of the Crown. His death illustrated the deteriorating circumstances in a town animated by hatred of Parliamentary import taxes, colonial attempts to strike at those taxes through non-importation of British goods, and the presence of an occupying standing army, something hated by Brits on both sides of the dispute, which led to fatal conflict and massacre.

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American Revolution: March to Massacre I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Throughout the fall and winter of 1769-1770 the tension mounted to poisonous levels in Boston between the townspeople and the troops sent to garrison the city. Two issues continued to arouse the passions of unrest: non-importation and the irritating presence of British troops sent by the London government to help collect the infamous import taxes imposed by Parliament and to keep order in a municipality that was increasingly unresponsive to royal authority. These two issues led ultimately to one of the important events in the run up to Revolution and war, the so-called Boston Massacre.

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The Spreading Flame III

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: Passage of the Stamp Tax by the British Parliament provoked several changes in the North American colonies. Rioting and civil disobedience were rampant. Advocates of the taxes were subjected to political pressure and physical violence. At the same time in most of the colonies a new class of leaders, such as Patrick Henry, began to help the public come to grips with a changing relationship with Britain, more resistant, even hostile to the interests of the mother country, and eventually to consider the path to independence.

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The Spreading Flame II

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: After the passage of the Stamp Act by Parliament in 1765, reaction was slow in coming but built all during the summer, fall and winter of 1765. In the end, Parliament was forced to repeal the Stamp Tax because of vigorous resistance within the colonies and not insignificant opposition within Parliament itself. With Virginia and Massachusetts leading the way, the flame of resistance began to spread to the other colonies.

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The Spreading Flame I

Lead: In the 1700s the United States broke from England. No colony in history had done that before. This series examines America’s Revolution.

Intro: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: The passage of the Stamp Act by the British Parliament in 1765 transformed the political landscape within the colonies of North America. The London government was determined to extract from the colonies sufficient revenue to pay for the troops stationed on the continent to protect British and colonial interests. They came up with a clever scheme to raise the cash. A significant portion of legal and business documents would have to be printed on stamped paper supplied by the government at a relatively nominal rate, but no one was fooled. This was a tax, plain and simple. The reaction was slow in coming but built all during the summer, fall, and winter of 1765. In the end Parliament was forced to repeal the Stamp Tax because of vigorous resistance within the colonies and not insignificant opposition within Parliament itself.

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Revolutionary War Battle of Petersburg

The great Civil War siege of Petersburg has given the City international notoriety, yet during the Revolution major fighting finally came to Virginia. Petersburg was in the thick of it. This is not surprising as General Washington had designated the City as one of the major supply depots for the Commonwealth and because Petersburg lay across the primary north-south communications line between the states, that route that follows modern day U.S. Highway 1.
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