Pseudocyesis of Mary Tudor II

Lead: Scorned by a nation appalled at her bloody attempts to restore Catholicism and abandoned by her Spanish husband, Queen Mary of England was further weakened emotionally by a series of false pregnancies.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: If she was to return England to the Catholic fold Mary knew she would need a long reign and an heir who shared her convictions, but her choice of her husband was a bad one. Philip was the heir to the Spanish throne and though he was the Queen's husband, from the beginning, he neither liked or was liked by the English people. The presence of the future King of Spain gave a bad odor to Mary's religious program and whipped up English nationalism.

Pseudocyesis of Mary Tudor I

Lead: Popular at the beginning of her rule, Queen Mary needed time and an heir to follow her. She got neither.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

Content: When Mary Tudor came to the English throne in the summer of 1553, the hopes of Catholics all over Europe were raised. She was committed to returning England to the Catholic faith, took as husband Philip, the future King of Spain, and set out to produce the heir who would confirm her rule and the Catholic restoration. The sadness of Mary was that both marriage and monarchy were failures. Her union with Philip lacked love and children, and her rule failed to return England to the Catholic fold.

Calvin Leaves Geneva

Lead: Soon after he took refuge in the City of Geneva John Calvin was told by the City Council to take a hike.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The religious life of France, parts of Germany, England, and the United States have been heavily influenced by the thought of John Calvin, but it was in 16th century Geneva, Switzerland that he hammered out many of his religious and political ideas. Calvin's stay in Geneva was often a bumpy ride.

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St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre II

Lead: Angered by being squeezed out of policy making and the growth of Protestant influence over her son Charles IX, Queen Mother Katherine de Medici planned to take out her enemies in a single night of blood.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the summer of 1572, the eyes of France were on Paris where the sister of the King was getting married. She was to become the bride of Prince Henry of Navarre and the King hoped their union would bring an end to a decade of religious warfare between Protestant and Catholic.

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St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre I

Lead: Catherine De Medici, Queen Mother of France, thought she could bring an end to religious warfare by killing off Protestant leaders in one great stroke.

Intro.: "A Moment in Time" with Dan Roberts.

Content: For two years since 1570, France had enjoyed an uneasy peace. France was split into three hostile camps. The first camp was Protestants, Catholics who believed the pope in Rome should rule the church and national Catholics who supported a Catholic church controlled by the King of France.

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Mike King Finds His Calling

Lead: The triumph of evil is often assured in the absence of a leader who will help people do good.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: It was unseasonably warm that December night in 1956. Four thousand people spilled out of the packed Holt Street Baptist Church. A prayer was said, a scripture passage was read and then a young man stood to the pulpit and began speaking. When he was finished a new era had begun.

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Religious Toleration

Lead: One of the primary motives behind settlement of North America was religious freedom. The Puritans settled Massachusetts is order to escape what they believed was the English government persecution because of their religious beliefs.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Once they established their settlements, however, it became clear that their idea of religious freedom was nothing close to the 20th century notion of religious toleration. The Puritans desired to be free to worship the way they pleased but if you were to live in Massachusetts, you had to exercise that freedom only if you were a Puritan. If you were a member of the Church of England or a Roman Catholic or a Baptist you would not be permitted to worship. With the exception of Roger Williams, Rhode Island, in which there was an openness to a variety of Protestant worship, only in Maryland was there a serious experiment with religious toleration.

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Cardinal Richelieu

Lead: One of history's most fascinating characters, served as First Minister to King Louis XIII of France, appointed in 1624, was Richelieu was the real ruler of France and more than any king helped establish the French monarchy as the absolute seat of authority in France.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts

He was one of the most brilliant statesmen of his era and pursued the power of the French king with every tool at his disposal. He was able to go quickly to the root of a problem and deal with it quickly with a will not effected by petty morality.

 

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