The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill

Lead: Of the major leaders of the twentieth century, none is thought to have equalled the speaking ability of Winston Churchill. Many credit his radio speeches during the dark days of World War II as helping to fend off defeat when Britain stood alone against Hitler's war machine.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Ironically, Churchill's rhetorical gifts were not natural. In fact his speeches were carefully crafted and meticulously rehearsed. He lacked a university education and as a member of Parliament early in the century, he encountered glib and eloquent graduates of the Oxford Debate Union and at times was bested by them. From then on he would write his speeches out and memorize them.  

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1968: Democratic National Convention I

 

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control

Content: As the hot summer of 1968 ground to a close, the Democrats prepared to descend on Chicago for their quadrennial gathering. The year had taken its toll. Assassination, riot, an unpopular war and a divided leadership left the Democrats in disarray. Richard Nixon was in the wings ready to take advantage of the Party’s malaise with his Republican arms flung wide in welcome to southerners disdainful of black demands, Americans sick of anti-war hippies, and a segment of society increasingly receptive to his hard-line message of law and order.

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1968: Democratic National Convention II

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

Content: From August 26-29, 1968, the eyes of the political world were fixed on Chicago and nominating convention of the Democratic Party. It was not a pretty sight. Inside the Chicago Amphitheater where the Convention met, the bright divisions within the Party were laid bare for all to see. The issue animating the struggle of course was the Vietnam War. It was seen as Lyndon Johnson’s war, but he was not there to contend for the nomination. Having recognized his unpopularity and problem re-election prospects, in the Spring he had declined to run for a second full term. His heir apparent was Vice-president Hubert Humphrey, former Senator from Minnesota and early champion of civil rights. An old-line liberal, he had been abandoned by many of his colleagues on the left because of his steadfast support for Johnson’s war policy.

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1968: Democratic National Convention III

Introduction: A Moment in Time, 1968: A special series on the 40th anniversary of a year of upheaval, in a world seemingly out of control.

                Content: Jerry Rubin was a Yippie, the nickname for members of the Youth International Party of which he was a founder. He and his troops descended on Chicago determined to protest the Vietnam War and racism in America. Denied permits to assemble and camp in city parks, the Yippies joined thousands of other activists on the streets of Chicago. In typically purple prose, Rubin warned of momentous events to come: "On Wednesday night the shit is really going to hit the fan 'cause we bust out of this park and go down to Grant Park and then go out to the amphitheater. There're going to be some right strange theatrical events. And you'd better have your theater thing down pretty pat."

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Americans and Taxation I

Lead: On February 3, 1913, the sixteenth amendment to the Constitution was adopted – making the income tax a permanent part of life in the United States.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Until the Civil War, the United States government relied heavily on tariffs (the taxes on imported goods) for revenue. Although the Constitution prohibited the government from imposing a direct tax on citizens, in 1862, during the Civil War, Congress passed an act which authorized the collection of the income tax in order to help finance a war that was costing the United States treasury one million dollars a day by 1862. With the Republic under threat, resistance to the income tax was not widespread. The wartime emergency income tax was reduced after the war and repealed in 1872.

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