Mt. Pelee II

Lead: During its deadly destruction of the Martinique port city of St. Pierre, Mt. Pelée threw up an unusual form of volcanic eruption, the nuée ardente, or glowing cloud.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Volcanoes come in different forms. Their shape is determined by a variety of factors: the amount, sequence, and contents of what comes out during an eruption and the nature of the vent and land through which it pushes its volcanic product called magma. The perfectly shaped volcanoes such as Mt. Fuji in Japan are called stratovolcanoes because in most cases, over a long period of time, they generate moderate eruptions of ash and lava which are then deposited in layers or strata. Mt. Pelée, a stratavolcano, towers 4500 feet above the northern end of the Caribbean Island of Martinique.

Mt. Pelee I

Lead: On the morning of May 8, 1902, a massive cloud of volcanic matter rolled out of the conical summit of Mt. Pelée and plunged toward the coastal city of St. Pierre on the Caribbean island of Martinique. Within minutes the 30,000 citizens of St. Pierre had been incinerated.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Visited by Columbus on his fourth voyage in 1502, Martinique was first settled by Europeans when the French established a colony there in 1635. Except for a few years during wartime, they retained control and French Martinique remains in the twenty-first century. The island was formed by volcanoes, the principal of which was Mt. Pelée, a stratovolcano towering 4500 feet above the northern end of the Island. Until 1902 the chief commercial center of Martinique was the port of St. Pierre three miles distant from Mt. Pelée.

Great Chicago Fire

Lead: Yes, it's true. The cow did kick over a lantern and Chicago went up in flames.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the fall of 1871 the city of Chicago was the focus of enormous amount of political activity, the junction of numerous railroads, home of countless commercial enterprises. The city was young and brash and rich, a exciting place to be and in that October lay along the shores of Lake Michigan a ready victim for one of the largest municipal fires in American history.

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Alaska’s Great Shock

Lead: Five years after it became the 49th state, Alaska experienced the shock of a lifetime.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: On March 27, 1964 at 5:36 in the afternoon, North America's greatest recorded earthquake shattered the towns of Anchorage, Valdez, and Kodiak, Alaska. Measuring between 8.3 and 8.6 on the Richter scale and lasting for three remarkable minutes, the Great Alaska Earthquake released twice as much energy as the earthquake that destroyed San Francisco in 1906. Hundreds of homes and structures were blown apart, and the town of Valdez was inundated by a huge tidal wave.

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Titanic II

Lead: On the evening of April 14, 1912, in the radio room of the Titanic, the pride of the White Star Line and the largest ship afloat, radio operator Jack Phillips had his hands full. Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts Content: Phillips was busy sending passenger messages to friends and relatives which had been backing up while the ship was out of radio range in mid-ocean. About 9:30 He was interrupted by a message from the steamer Mesaba to the Captain, "Ice Report. Saw much heavy pack ice and great number large icebergs. Also Field Ice. Weather good. Clear." Now Phillips had had a very rough day and this new message didn't seem very important to him. He never delivered it.

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Titanic I

Lead: It was about 11:15. The cold night seem

In the radio room, operator Cyril Evans began to pick up a large amount of traffic between a passenger liner quite close by and the telegraph relay station on the coast of Newfoundland at Cape Race. Evans interrupted and telegraphed, “We're stopped and surrounded by ice. The Liner replied, "Shut up! Shut up! I'm busy, I'm working Cape Race." Twenty minutes later he could still hear the liner sending its passenger telegrams when he shut down his set and went to bed.

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Mt. Pelee Erupts II

Lead: During its deadly destruction of the Martinique port city of St. Pierre, Mt. Pelée threw up an unusual form of volcanic eruption, the nuée ardente, or glowing cloud.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Volcanoes come in different forms. Their shape is determined by a variety of factors: the amount, sequence, and contents of what comes out during an eruption and the nature of the vent and land through which it pushes its volcanic product called magma. The perfectly shaped volcanoes such as Mt. Fuji in Japan are called stratovolcanoes because in most cases, over a long period of time, they generate moderate eruptions of ash and lava which are then deposited in layers or strata. Mt. Pelée, a stratavolcano, towers 4500 feet above the northern end of the Caribbean Island of Martinique.

Mt. Pelee Erupts I

Lead: On the morning of May 8, 1902, a massive cloud of volcanic matter rolled out of the conical summit of Mt. Pelée and plunged toward the coastal city of St. Pierre on the Caribbean island of Martinique. Within minutes the 30,000 citizens of St. Pierre had been incinerated.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Visited by Columbus on his fourth voyage in 1502, Martinique was first settled by Europeans when the French established a colony there in 1635. Except for a few years during wartime, they retained control and French Martinique remains in the twenty-first century. The island was formed by volcanoes, the principal of which was Mt. Pelée, a stratovolcano towering 4500 feet above the northern end of the Island. Until 1902 the chief commercial center of Martinique was the port of St. Pierre three miles distant from Mt. Pelée.