The Know-Nothing Party II

Lead: Formed to resist the flood of immigrants in the 1850s, the Know-Nothing Party made prejudice pay big dividends at the ballot box.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1853 the Order of United Americans had chapters in towns all over the country. Riding a wave of resentment against the huge influx of German and Irish immigrants, the Order was better known as the Know-Nothing movement. Legend says that it took its name from what members said to questions about the Order's secret meetings - "I know nothing."

The Know-Nothing Party I

Lead: In 1854 the Know-Nothing Party riding a wave of anti-immigrant prejudice, rolled up victory after victory. Except for the pre-Civil War Republicans, it was the best third party showing in American history.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The United States is nation of immigrants. Beginning with the Jamestown Colony in 1607, successive waves of aliens have sought a new life and prosperity in what they considered to be a land of opportunity. Crowding out the original Native Americans, whose ancient ancestors actually may have themselves emigrated from the eastern Asia, more strangers arrived each decade in search of a new home. Within a couple of generations, their families now firmly established, many of the newcomers considered themselves "native Americans" and looked with barely tolerant superiority at the next batch of immigrants spilling onto the docks of Boston, Philadelphia, and New York

Democrats & 1964 Convention IV

Lead: The decline of the Democratic Party in the late 20th century can be attributed in part to its decision to champion black civil rights. This offended many racist Southern whites who migrated into the Republican Party.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party emerged from voter registration efforts in the summer of 1964. One of its goals was to present a competing delegation to the Convention in Atlantic City in August. When the two groups arrived, the Party was in a quandary. Here was one group claiming the moral the high ground; some of its members, directly touched by the bloody Mississippi violence of that summer. The other group represented the vast majority of white Mississippians most of whom were opposed to black progress. Even party liberals, such as Senator Hubert Humphrey were conflicted.

Democrats & 1964 Convention III

Lead: The slipping fortunes of the Democratic Party in 1990s can be seen in part to result from its decision to champion black civil rights. This trend was confirmed at Atlantic City in August 1964.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Lyndon Johnson, told one of his aides, Joseph Califano, “I think we’ve delivered the South to the Republican Party for your lifetime and mine.” While his accurate prediction was decades off the mark, the process that led to that Democratic Party implosion was confirmed at the quadrennial party gathering in Atlantic City that summer. One of the persons responsible for the party’s moral triumph, but steady political decline, was a soft-spoken, intellectual schoolteacher from New York named Bob Moses.

Democrats & 1964 Convention II

Lead: At the Democratic Convention of 1964, competing visions over how to eliminate overt racism in America, secured an electoral triumph but laid the foundation for the precipitous decline of the Party over the next three decades.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.
Content: Hubert Horatio Humphrey was a classic liberal, economically and socially. He led the charge to firmly establish the national Democratic Party on the side of African Americans in their quest for freedom. At the Convention in 1948 Humphrey argued for a much stronger Civil Rights plank in the platform and prevailed. This angered many southerners who felt that any progress by blacks was a threat to white supremacy. Led by then Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, many southerners bolted the convention. Thurmond ran for President, but the election was Harry Truman’s in 1948. The southerner, however, would have his revenge

Democrats & 1964 Convention I

Lead: At the Democratic Convention of 1964, Lyndon Johnson was overwhelmingly nominated for President, but those brief days in August confirmed a tectonic shift taking place in American politics.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.Content: When the Democrats assembled in the decaying resort of Atlantic City in the late summer, the outcome was never in doubt. President Johnson would be the nominee. The party was still reeling from the assassination shock of the previous year and would go on to crush the Republicans in an electoral tsunami that would sweep away the conservative challenger Barry Goldwater and dozens of GOP congressmen and Senators. Yet, the events of that August week would seal the fate of the Democrats and make possible the Republican revolution that transformed national politics three decades later.

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First Ladies: Mamie Doud Eisenhower

Lead: Through the years of lonely separation and worry that are part of the life of a military spouse, Mamie Geneva Doud Eisenhower never liked it but loved her Kansas farm boy and was there for the long haul.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Dwight Eisenhower was a second lieutenant fresh from West Point when he first laid eyes on Mamie Geneva Doud, daughter of a wealthy Denver family who wintered in San Antonio. She was standing on the porch of the Officer’s Club at Fort Sam Houston when as Officer of the Day he walked by on his rounds. She thought he was the most handsome male she had ever seen; he was struck with her vivacious personality and attractive, saucy looks. They were married in the summer of 1916.

The Know-Nothing Party II

Lead: Formed to resist the flood of immigrants in the 1850s, the Know-Nothing Party made prejudice pay big dividends at the ballot box.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: By 1853 the Order of United Americans had chapters in towns all over the country. Riding a wave of resentment against the huge influx of German and Irish immigrants, the Order was better known as the Know-Nothing movement. Legend says that it took its name from what members said to questions about the Order's secret meetings - "I know nothing."

Read more →