Democrats & 1964 Convention III

Lead: The slipping fortunes of the Democratic Party in 1990s can be seen in part to result from its decision to champion black civil rights. This trend was confirmed at Atlantic City in August 1964.

Intro. : A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: When he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Lyndon Johnson, told one of his aides, Joseph Califano, “I think we’ve delivered the South to the Republican Party for your lifetime and mine.” While his accurate prediction was decades off the mark, the process that led to that Democratic Party implosion was confirmed at the quadrennial party gathering in Atlantic City that summer. One of the persons responsible for the party’s moral triumph, but steady political decline, was a soft-spoken, intellectual schoolteacher from New York named Bob Moses.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention II

Lead: At the Democratic Convention of 1964, competing visions over how to eliminate overt racism in America, secured an electoral triumph but laid the foundation for the precipitous decline of the Party over the next three decades.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Hubert Horatio Humphrey was a classic liberal, economically and socially. He led the charge to firmly establish the national Democratic Party on the side of African Americans in their quest for freedom. At the Convention in 1948 Humphrey argued for a much stronger Civil Rights plank in the platform and prevailed. This angered many southerners who felt that any progress by blacks was a threat to white supremacy. Led by then Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, many S

outherners bolted the convention. Thurmond ran for President, but the election was Harry Truman’s in 1948. The Southerner, however, would have his revenge.

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Democrats & 1964 Convention I

Lead: At the Democratic Convention of 1964, Lyndon Johnson was overwhelmingly nominated for President, but those brief days in August confirmed a tectonic shift taking place in American politics.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.Content: When the Democrats assembled in the decaying resort of Atlantic City in the late summer, the outcome was never in doubt. President Johnson would be the nominee. The party was still reeling from the assassination shock of the previous year and would go on to crush the Republicans in an electoral tsunami that would sweep away the conservative challenger Barry Goldwater and dozens of GOP congressmen and Senators. Yet, the events of that August week would seal the fate of the Democrats and make possible the Republican revolution that transformed national politics three decades later.

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First Ladies: Sarah Childress Polk

 Lead: The wife of the tenth President of the United States was the ideal political spouse: devoted, principled, and ambitious.

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In 1823 James Knox Polk was stuck in what he considered a dead end job as a clerk employed by the Tennessee legislature. He asked Andrew Jackson, just beginning his first run for the Presidency, what advice he would give for success in politics. Jackson told him, "stop this philandering...settle down as a sober married man." "Which lady shall I choose?" asked Polk. "The one who will never give you no trouble," replied Jackson, "you know her well." "You mean Sarah Childress?" Polk asked, thought a minute, went out and asked her to marry him. He never regretted the choice.

 

A House Divided: Bloody Civil War Tactics II

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In later years, General Daniel Harvey Hill remembered the Confederate dead stacked like cordwood before Yankee lines at Gaines Mill east of Richmond during the Seven Days Battles in 1862. He said, “It was thought to be a great thing to charge a battery of artillery or an earthwork lined with infantry….We were very lavish of blood in those days.” But, in fact, it was the tactics of Hill and his fellow leaders as much as the gallantry of their men that caused such a surfeit of gore. Union and Confederate leaders alike threw men into horrendously fatal charges against breastworks filled with vigilant enemy soldiers armed to the teeth over and over and over again. It was calculated that a charging enemy had to have a 3-1 advantage if it was to overcome troops dug and ready.

 

A House Divided: Bloody Civil War Tactics I

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: In the course of military history it has often been the case that armies prepare for the last war. Unable to see into the future, changes in strategy, tactics and weaponry come only with the experience of the current war. It is one of the great tragedies of the American Civil War that the learning curve among military leaders was so slow that tactics even up until the last year produced a grisly ingathering of causalities on both sides – more than 600,000 dead over a four-year period. Recognizing that disease was one of the most vicious of executioners in both Rebel and Yankee armies, leaders still were painfully slow on the uptake, not realizing that the tactics they were using increased casualty rates.

A House Divided (Civil War): The Great Congress II

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: Despite its reputation for inertia, the U.S. Congress on occasion is capable of electrifying and revolutionary activity. But if the truth be known, such seasons of spectacular innovation occur more often than not when a single political party is in close to absolute control of the levers of congressional power and Congress is driven by an determined President of the majority party with visionary ambitions.

A House Divided (Civil War): The Great Congress I

 

Lead: One hundred and fifty years ago the Republic was facing its greatest crisis. This continuing series examines the American Civil War. It is "A House Divided."

Intro.: A Moment in Time with Dan Roberts.

Content: The position of a legislature in a republic is essentially conservative. Elected representatives tend to reflect the sentiments of their constituents who are not particularly inclined toward revolutionary enterprise. This is not difficult to understand as voters are usually required to pay the price in blood and treasure for their leaders’ ambitions. In U.S. history this has tended to insure that Congress has acted as a brake on Executive pretension. Presidents propose, Congresses dispose, or more often reject, the motivations of Chief Executives.